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Edward Fields Iconics

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Edward Fields—an American carpet maker whose rugs dress the floors in the Glass House, Hollyhock House, and Lever House—recently released "Iconics," a collection of eleven designs inspired by their most distinct patterns unveiled throughout their 70 year history. Ranging from retro designs of the 1950's and 1960's to more contemporary patterns from the 1980's and 1990's, these "reissued" rugs represent what Edward Fields has long been known for: distinct, bold patterns and an experimental sensibility. While the patterns remain largely untouched from their originals, their current iterations have been adapted for today's tastes (think shorter pile height, new materials and a modern color palette). Click through the slideshow to see the designs along with a few mid-century photographs of the carpets in-situ.

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  "Reflections" was originally commissioned in the late 1960's for Edward Fields' own apartment in New York City. The carpet is a wool and silk blend and features 12 different (and fully customizable) colors.
    "Reflections" was originally commissioned in the late 1960's for Edward Fields' own apartment in New York City. The carpet is a wool and silk blend and features 12 different (and fully customizable) colors.
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  "Reflections," photographed in the 1960's. Edward Fields established his company in 1935 when he was a young man of just 23 years.
    "Reflections," photographed in the 1960's. Edward Fields established his company in 1935 when he was a young man of just 23 years.
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  The "Reflections" rug in another circa 1960's interior. Fields' rugs can be found in some of the most famous mid-century homes, including  Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill's Lever House, Philip Johnson's Glass House, and Frank Lloyd Wright's Hollyhock House.
    The "Reflections" rug in another circa 1960's interior. Fields' rugs can be found in some of the most famous mid-century homes, including Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill's Lever House, Philip Johnson's Glass House, and Frank Lloyd Wright's Hollyhock House.
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  The "Short Circuit" carpet by Edward Fields.
    The "Short Circuit" carpet by Edward Fields.
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  "Short Circuit" was popular in the 1970s for its bold pattern. Throughout the company's 70-year history, Edward Fields has collaborated with some of the most talented designers, including Raymond Lowey, textile designer Marion Dorn, Burt Groedel, and Van Day Treux, among others.
    "Short Circuit" was popular in the 1970s for its bold pattern. Throughout the company's 70-year history, Edward Fields has collaborated with some of the most talented designers, including Raymond Lowey, textile designer Marion Dorn, Burt Groedel, and Van Day Treux, among others.
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  "Earthquake" is a design originally from the 1970s. The golden ripples are silk and the grey is wool.
    "Earthquake" is a design originally from the 1970s. The golden ripples are silk and the grey is wool.
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  The "Terra IV" carpet was designed for Brooke Astor by Van Day Truex and is the most popular design in the Edward Fields archive.
    The "Terra IV" carpet was designed for Brooke Astor by Van Day Truex and is the most popular design in the Edward Fields archive.
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  A detail of the pattern in the Terra IV rug.
    A detail of the pattern in the Terra IV rug.
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  A 1950's interior featuring the Terra rug.
    A 1950's interior featuring the Terra rug.
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  The design of "Computations" is a take on computer pixels, and was originally released in the 1970s.
    The design of "Computations" is a take on computer pixels, and was originally released in the 1970s.
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  Countless hand-tufted squares make up the overall design. Edward Fields' carpets are all handmade. Typically, a single artisan works on a rug from start to end to ensure greater uniformity in the completed product.
    Countless hand-tufted squares make up the overall design. Edward Fields' carpets are all handmade. Typically, a single artisan works on a rug from start to end to ensure greater uniformity in the completed product.
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  Another 1970s design: "Lonesome Road."
    Another 1970s design: "Lonesome Road."
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  Raised scalloped edges articulate the rich dyes in the wool and silk rug.
    Raised scalloped edges articulate the rich dyes in the wool and silk rug.
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  The "Secret Cavern," originally designed in the 1990s, is adapted to suit today's stylistic trends with a shorter pile height than its predecessor.
    The "Secret Cavern," originally designed in the 1990s, is adapted to suit today's stylistic trends with a shorter pile height than its predecessor.
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  A detail showing the color variation and different textural details of the carpet.
    A detail showing the color variation and different textural details of the carpet.
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  "Splashdown" was originally designed in the 1980s. Its starburst pattern and luxuriant materials (wool, cashmere, and silver lurex) are indicative of the popular trends of the decade.
    "Splashdown" was originally designed in the 1980s. Its starburst pattern and luxuriant materials (wool, cashmere, and silver lurex) are indicative of the popular trends of the decade.
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  The "Wavelength" rug.
    The "Wavelength" rug.
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  The "Wavelength" rug, designed in the 1970s, shown up-close.
    The "Wavelength" rug, designed in the 1970s, shown up-close.
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  "Diversion" by Edward Fields.
    "Diversion" by Edward Fields.
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  "Interweave" by Edward Fields wraps up the 11 designs in the "Iconics" collection.

Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!
    "Interweave" by Edward Fields wraps up the 11 designs in the "Iconics" collection.

    Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

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