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Detail We Love: Butterfly Roofs

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Along with the gable and the A-frame, the butterfly roof is among the most distinctive of silhouettes. Seven Dwell favorites follow.
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  Illinois resident Mary Kalanzis rises every morning with a view worthy of the next world. "I wake up to the vision of the hut everyday," she says. "There's something about the proportions that make it appear heavenly." The hut is the butterfly-roof-adorned tea and meditation structure perched above a pond on their 14 acres in Champaign, Illinois.

    Illinois resident Mary Kalanzis rises every morning with a view worthy of the next world. "I wake up to the vision of the hut everyday," she says. "There's something about the proportions that make it appear heavenly." The hut is the butterfly-roof-adorned tea and meditation structure perched above a pond on their 14 acres in Champaign, Illinois.

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  A 1950s Joseph Esherick home in Berkeley, California, inspires an addition that pays homage to the past yet is poised to host the next generation. Photo by Caren Alpert.  Photo by: Caren Alpert

    A 1950s Joseph Esherick home in Berkeley, California, inspires an addition that pays homage to the past yet is poised to host the next generation. Photo by Caren Alpert.

    Photo by: Caren Alpert

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  It took a mere six months—three in the factory and three on-site—for this prefab to come to fruition on the shore of Sweden’s Müsko Island.  Courtesy of: Louise Billgert

    It took a mere six months—three in the factory and three on-site—for this prefab to come to fruition on the shore of Sweden’s Müsko Island.

    Courtesy of: Louise Billgert

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  In the heart of Atlanta, Shawn Moseley worked closely with designer Scott Ball to design and build his new house not ten minutes from downtown. Photo by Mark Steinmetz.  Photo by: Mark Steinmetz

    In the heart of Atlanta, Shawn Moseley worked closely with designer Scott Ball to design and build his new house not ten minutes from downtown. Photo by Mark Steinmetz.

    Photo by: Mark Steinmetz

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  When a 40-year-old pine tree fell over at the rear of a Brentwood estate in Los Angeles a few years back, its owner, an art lover and a philanthropist, let it lie. The tree revived itself, continuing to grow from its newfound horizontal position. At that point, the owner decided to honor its resilience by incorporating it into a 172-square-foot office / guest house.  Photo by: Eric StaudenmaierCourtesy of: Eric Staudenmaier

    When a 40-year-old pine tree fell over at the rear of a Brentwood estate in Los Angeles a few years back, its owner, an art lover and a philanthropist, let it lie. The tree revived itself, continuing to grow from its newfound horizontal position. At that point, the owner decided to honor its resilience by incorporating it into a 172-square-foot office / guest house.

    Photo by: Eric Staudenmaier

    Courtesy of: Eric Staudenmaier

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  A Martha’s Vineyard retreat surpasses the traditional boundaries of Cape Cod architecture with a contemporary design by Harvard professor and practicing architect Toshiko Mori. (Technically an "inverted hip roof" and not a butterfly roof.)

    A Martha’s Vineyard retreat surpasses the traditional boundaries of Cape Cod architecture with a contemporary design by Harvard professor and practicing architect Toshiko Mori. (Technically an "inverted hip roof" and not a butterfly roof.)

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  The restoration of Marcel Breuer's House in a Museum Garden is an exercise in balancing the Bauhaus architect's original intent with the realities of everyday living. It features a butterfly roof, a core detail in Breuer's "bi-nuclear" design. Photo by Diana Budds.

    The restoration of Marcel Breuer's House in a Museum Garden is an exercise in balancing the Bauhaus architect's original intent with the realities of everyday living. It features a butterfly roof, a core detail in Breuer's "bi-nuclear" design. Photo by Diana Budds.

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