written by:
August 8, 2013
For a youthful perspective on design's playful potential, look no farther than this slideshow. These five rooms put the fun back in functional.
Designer Erica Islas grabs a book inside the lower space of the Palisades Kids' Room, showing it's big enough for adults as it is for children.

Design isn't just for adults anymore; the demand for innovative kids' spaces in on the rise. Erica Islas, founder of EMI Interior Design, has been busy creating nursery, kids, and play rooms. Some trends she's spotted recently: "Right now there are a lot of activity-driven things like rock-climbing walls or swings inside rooms. The thing that's taking over chalkboard walls are wall-to-wall dry-erase walls because they're not as messy." She's pictured here in a room she designed in Los Angeles, which features a rock-climbing wall, rope, and plenty of little hangout nooks. Read more childrens' room tips from the designer.

Originally appeared in Erica Islas on Kids' Spaces
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All it takes is gentle downward pressure to lower the desk to the floor, bringing the kid-size mattress into position for bedtime.

Living small is par for the course in New York City, but accommodating a family of four in under 700 square feet rarely looks as effortless as in this storage-smart renovation. In Jonah Finger's room, all it takes is gentle downward pressure to lower a built-in desk to the floor, bringing a kid-size mattress into position for bedtime. Photo by Raimund Koch.

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Originally appeared in Storage-Smart Renovation in New York City
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Ground-floor gallery with library shelving
In the ground-floor gallery of Andrew Dunbar and Zoee Astrakhan's San Francisco home, 40-foot-long library shelving is punctuated by floor-to-ceiling columns made from white acrylic panels that conceal low-cost fluorescent-tube lighting. The shelves are enlivened by sliding panels made of Homasote (composed of 98 percent post-consumer recycled paper mulch). They shield books while also providing pin-up space for the children's art projects and the office's large-format print-outs and house plans. Photo by Justin Fantl.

 

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justin fantl photography
Originally appeared in Just Redo It
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Green magnet wall

Elsewhere in Dunbar and Astrkhan's family home in San Francisco, walls serve another fun purpose for their kids. The couple initially painted partition walls between the children's room and their own with black metallic paint creating both a writing surface for the children and a magnetic bulletin board for notes. However, "the black looked too oppressive," Astrakhan says. So they applied several coats of lively lime green paint to brighten up that section of the house. Photo by Justin Fantl.

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Originally appeared in Just Redo It
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Formal lounge area with leather and rosewood chairs

A mix of warm Brazilian furniture, refined antiques, period furniture, and contemporary lighting turn this renovation project in a hip suburb of Melbourne, Australia, into a family home for the ages. Photo by Stephen Oxenbury.

Originally appeared in Aussie Living Room We Love
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Designer Erica Islas grabs a book inside the lower space of the Palisades Kids' Room, showing it's big enough for adults as it is for children.

Design isn't just for adults anymore; the demand for innovative kids' spaces in on the rise. Erica Islas, founder of EMI Interior Design, has been busy creating nursery, kids, and play rooms. Some trends she's spotted recently: "Right now there are a lot of activity-driven things like rock-climbing walls or swings inside rooms. The thing that's taking over chalkboard walls are wall-to-wall dry-erase walls because they're not as messy." She's pictured here in a room she designed in Los Angeles, which features a rock-climbing wall, rope, and plenty of little hangout nooks. Read more childrens' room tips from the designer.

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