Bright Idea: 5 Homes with Statement Skylights

written by:
August 7, 2013
In these five homes, a well-placed skylight makes all the difference, flooding the interiors with light from above.
  • 
  In Toronto, a painter accustomed to crashing in his studio created an airy artistic haven with both working and living quarters for a more balanced and polished picture. A skylight lets light stream into the dining area, which doubles as a studio/work space. A vintage Danish dining set and Cloud pendants by Frank Gehry for Vitra anchor the room. Photo by Matthew Williams.  Photo by: Matthew WilliamsCourtesy of: matthew williams

    In Toronto, a painter accustomed to crashing in his studio created an airy artistic haven with both working and living quarters for a more balanced and polished picture. A skylight lets light stream into the dining area, which doubles as a studio/work space. A vintage Danish dining set and Cloud pendants by Frank Gehry for Vitra anchor the room. Photo by Matthew Williams.

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Courtesy of: matthew williams

  • 
  It’s not easy to transform a 15-foot-wide building site—wedged between houses in every direction—into a home that feels more spacious than its location allows. Mamm-design’s solution was to dedicate two-thirds of this tiny 653-square-foot house in Tokyo to a 20-foot-high garden room to bring a sense of the outdoors in. A centrally positioned evergreen ash anchors the airy terrace, which is paved with complementary gray bricks. The kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, and workspace are all connected to the central space, transforming the covered veranda into a surrealistic theatrical setting for day-to-day life.  Courtesy of: (c) DAICI ANO / FWD

    It’s not easy to transform a 15-foot-wide building site—wedged between houses in every direction—into a home that feels more spacious than its location allows. Mamm-design’s solution was to dedicate two-thirds of this tiny 653-square-foot house in Tokyo to a 20-foot-high garden room to bring a sense of the outdoors in. A centrally positioned evergreen ash anchors the airy terrace, which is paved with complementary gray bricks. The kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, and workspace are all connected to the central space, transforming the covered veranda into a surrealistic theatrical setting for day-to-day life.

    Courtesy of: (c) DAICI ANO / FWD

  • 
  American history lives on in a family’s Tribeca, New York, loft after a renovation by Pulltab Design. The firm's inventive use of motorized skylights connected to light wells, which punctuate the space, allowed the architects to create rooms that city ordinances would usually not have permitted. (New York City code prohibits interior rooms that lack light and ventilation, so dividing up a loft space with no windows along a parti wall can be problematic.) They separated the living room from the kitchen-dining area by constructing a boxed-in structure between the two and adding operable skylights to both newly carved-out spaces. Photo by João Canziani.  Photo by: João Canziani

    American history lives on in a family’s Tribeca, New York, loft after a renovation by Pulltab Design. The firm's inventive use of motorized skylights connected to light wells, which punctuate the space, allowed the architects to create rooms that city ordinances would usually not have permitted. (New York City code prohibits interior rooms that lack light and ventilation, so dividing up a loft space with no windows along a parti wall can be problematic.) They separated the living room from the kitchen-dining area by constructing a boxed-in structure between the two and adding operable skylights to both newly carved-out spaces. Photo by João Canziani.

    Photo by: João Canziani

  • 
  For Tad Beck, making a home out of a stolid, windowless warehouse meant opening it up from the inside out. Thanks to designer Riley Pratt, and a well-placed skylight, the shower in the bathroom feels like it's outdoors. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.  Photo by: Dave Lauridsen
    For Tad Beck, making a home out of a stolid, windowless warehouse meant opening it up from the inside out. Thanks to designer Riley Pratt, and a well-placed skylight, the shower in the bathroom feels like it's outdoors. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

  • 
  In a Cambridge, Massachusetts, house renovated by Beat Schenk and Chaewon Kim, an ingenious floor treatment—slats laid over the ceiling beams—enables the skylight to do double duty, pouring sunlight into the living room below. The translucent bathroom wall turns that into triple duty. Photo by Adam Friedberg.  Photo by: Adam Friedberg

    In a Cambridge, Massachusetts, house renovated by Beat Schenk and Chaewon Kim, an ingenious floor treatment—slats laid over the ceiling beams—enables the skylight to do double duty, pouring sunlight into the living room below. The translucent bathroom wall turns that into triple duty. Photo by Adam Friedberg.

    Photo by: Adam Friedberg

@current / @total

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...