8 Space-Saving Sliding Doors

written by:
January 13, 2014
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  At the Fisher family’s 1960s Long Island beach bungalow, reimagined by architect Page Goolrick, Emily peeks out from a sliding panel door with matte marine hardware that will age gracefully in the salty air. Photo by Richard Foulser.  Photo by Richard Foulser.   This originally appeared in Long Island Found.

    At the Fisher family’s 1960s Long Island beach bungalow, reimagined by architect Page Goolrick, Emily peeks out from a sliding panel door with matte marine hardware that will age gracefully in the salty air. Photo by Richard Foulser.

    Photo by Richard Foulser.
    This originally appeared in Long Island Found.
  • 
  Architects Takaharu and Yui Tezuka designed a small home in Tokyo that opens completely on one side. The magic wall-disappearing act is accomplished by means of sliding glass panels, which the family tends to leave open almost year-round. Photo by Adam Friedberg.   Photo by Adam Friedberg.   This originally appeared in Family Style.

    Architects Takaharu and Yui Tezuka designed a small home in Tokyo that opens completely on one side. The magic wall-disappearing act is accomplished by means of sliding glass panels, which the family tends to leave open almost year-round. Photo by Adam Friedberg. 

    Photo by Adam Friedberg.
    This originally appeared in Family Style.
  • 
  In one Los Angeles renovation by architect Jeremy Levine, this little Robinia tree moved from another part of the site grows in a pocket courtyard and thermal chimney in the heart of the house. Swinging doors would be out of the question in a space like this. Photo by Tom Fowlks.   Photo by Tom Fowlks.   This originally appeared in Casa Study House #1.

    In one Los Angeles renovation by architect Jeremy Levine, this little Robinia tree moved from another part of the site grows in a pocket courtyard and thermal chimney in the heart of the house. Swinging doors would be out of the question in a space like this. Photo by Tom Fowlks. 

    Photo by Tom Fowlks.
    This originally appeared in Casa Study House #1.
  • 
  When a sliding door isn't enough, try a sliding wall, like in this Tokyo architect’s shape-shifting apartment. A hole in the sliding wall fits over the table, enabling it to be used in both the library and the meeting room.   Photo by Ryohei Hamada.   This originally appeared in Simple Division.

    When a sliding door isn't enough, try a sliding wall, like in this Tokyo architect’s shape-shifting apartment. A hole in the sliding wall fits over the table, enabling it to be used in both the library and the meeting room. 

    Photo by Ryohei Hamada.
    This originally appeared in Simple Division.
  • 
  Priced out of the modern market and stuck with a fixer-upper that seemed unfixable, a young L.A. lawyer took matters into his own hands—and found a new career in the process. Translucent sliding doors with exposed hardware increase bathroom space and light.     This originally appeared in A Modern House on a Budget in Los Angeles.

    Priced out of the modern market and stuck with a fixer-upper that seemed unfixable, a young L.A. lawyer took matters into his own hands—and found a new career in the process. Translucent sliding doors with exposed hardware increase bathroom space and light. 

    This originally appeared in A Modern House on a Budget in Los Angeles.
  • 
  At the Barn and the Lantern house in Studio City, California, a new addition includes tall sliding doors topped by a frieze of windows to help elevate the light that now pours into the home, which was much darker before the renovation. At left is a load-bearing shear wall that pulls in colors from elements within the house’s existing palette. Photo by Christa Mae.   Photo by Christa Mae.   This originally appeared in The Barn and the Lantern.

    At the Barn and the Lantern house in Studio City, California, a new addition includes tall sliding doors topped by a frieze of windows to help elevate the light that now pours into the home, which was much darker before the renovation. At left is a load-bearing shear wall that pulls in colors from elements within the house’s existing palette. Photo by Christa Mae. 

    Photo by Christa Mae.
    This originally appeared in The Barn and the Lantern.
  • 
  At a house in New South Wales, Australia, by Shane Blue of Bourne + Blue Architecture, a huge sliding door greets visitors and keeps things out of the way. Photo by Simon Whitbread.   Photo by Simon Whitbread. Courtesy of Copyright Simon Whitbread.  This originally appeared in Adventures in Oz.

    At a house in New South Wales, Australia, by Shane Blue of Bourne + Blue Architecture, a huge sliding door greets visitors and keeps things out of the way. Photo by Simon Whitbread. 

    Photo by Simon Whitbread. Courtesy of Copyright Simon Whitbread.
    This originally appeared in Adventures in Oz.
  • 
  On occasion, there's not even room for the width of a typical sliding door, as in architectural designer Alan Y. L. Chan's 400-square-foot New York apartment. The full-height glass is stationary except for a sliding door at left, and a curtain can be rolled down for privacy.    This originally appeared in Domestic Ribbon.

    On occasion, there's not even room for the width of a typical sliding door, as in architectural designer Alan Y. L. Chan's 400-square-foot New York apartment. The full-height glass is stationary except for a sliding door at left, and a curtain can be rolled down for privacy.

    This originally appeared in Domestic Ribbon.
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