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June 13, 2013
We see a lot of “green” architecture in the Dwell office, but these seven homes don’t just borrow the buzzword, they push boundaries and challenge the idea of what sustainability really means in architecture.
Mooney and Sparano’s house glows like a lantern against a backdrop of scrubby oaks, faux colonials, and “wannabe lodges” with more square footage but less eco-cred. The home’s northwest facade, facing the canyon and a 200-acre camp for individuals with di
The New Pioneers  Utah’s first LEED for homes is nestled into the side of Emigration Canyon is designed to be flexible and adaptable to their growing family’s needs. 
Photo by 
Originally appeared in The First LEED for Homes–Rated House in Utah
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Instead of installing a typical cement slab driveway, Waechter and Crymes opted for concrete pavers mixed with patches of Corsican mint that let rainwater permeate into the ground.
Z for Two  Two adjoining six-story homes restore a formerly run-down urban lot in Portland, Oregon,  with Z-Haus, Atelier Waechter’s take on a European sustainable home.
Photo by 
Originally appeared in Z for Two
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Solar energy house in Denver’s Highland neighborhood
The Bright Stuff  “The premise was to build a house that would last 400 years,” says the resident of this Denver abode that runs completely on solar power.
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prefab beach house retreat
A Sweetheart Deal  An elegant beach house stays in tune with its surroundings by using a prefabricated foundation, geothermal heating, and passive systems. 
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
© TY COLE
Originally appeared in Green Sustainable Home in Montauk
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Modern bamboo-clad farmhouse with solar panels
Passive Progressive  Among the first Passive Houses in France, this bamboo-clad farmhouse by the Parisian firm Karawitz Architecture only uses a tenth of the energy a conventionally constructed home does.
 
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
© 2012 Nicholas Calcott
Originally appeared in Passive Progressive
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Recycled Home in the Netherlands
A Super Recycled House in the Netherlands  In the eastern Netherlands, Superuse Studios built a home almost entirely out of locally sourced scrap from billboards to broken umbrellas. 
Photo by 
Originally appeared in A Super-Recycled House in the Netherlands
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Sustainable home with galvanized steel shed roof and siding
Into the Great Wide Open  This 925-square-foot house in a rural corner of Ontario relied on passive heating and cooling strategies to become off-the-grid. 
Photo by 
Courtesy of 
© Derek Shapton
Originally appeared in A Sustainably Built Home in Rural Ontario
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Mooney and Sparano’s house glows like a lantern against a backdrop of scrubby oaks, faux colonials, and “wannabe lodges” with more square footage but less eco-cred. The home’s northwest facade, facing the canyon and a 200-acre camp for individuals with di
The New Pioneers  Utah’s first LEED for homes is nestled into the side of Emigration Canyon is designed to be flexible and adaptable to their growing family’s needs. 
Photo by Dustin Aksland.

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