5 Surprising Clothing Storage Solutions

written by:
August 28, 2013
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  When Im and David Schafer moved in together they faced the challenge of combining the contents of David’s 880-square-foot loft and Im’s 550-square-foot apartment into a one-room, 426-square-foot downtown San Diego loft. To cope, they created what they call the Wall of Storage. Local sailboat shops wanted thousands to make the 13-by-13-foot curtain that hides the storage wall. "We called my parents in Bangkok, gave them the dimensions, and they got it made for 150 bucks." says Im. Photo by Misha Gravenor.  Photo by Misha Gravenor.   This originally appeared in Living Room.

    When Im and David Schafer moved in together they faced the challenge of combining the contents of David’s 880-square-foot loft and Im’s 550-square-foot apartment into a one-room, 426-square-foot downtown San Diego loft. To cope, they created what they call the Wall of Storage. Local sailboat shops wanted thousands to make the 13-by-13-foot curtain that hides the storage wall. "We called my parents in Bangkok, gave them the dimensions, and they got it made for 150 bucks." says Im. Photo by Misha Gravenor.

    Photo by Misha Gravenor.
    This originally appeared in Living Room.
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  For a couple living in a 900-square-foot house in Malibu, architect Bruce Bolander created a colorful, laminate-clad wall of storage that stretches seamlessly from the kitchen—where it holds a full-size built-in Sub-Zero refrigerator and freezer, a Miele dishwasher, a Bosch cooktop, and a tiny convection oven—to the bedroom, where it contains the couple’s clothing, shoes, and linens. In such a small space “you have to organize, and every piece takes a decision,” says resident Heidi Wright. The couple keep things they use less frequently, like guest bedding, in the higher cabinets. Photo by J Bennett Fitts.   Photo by J Bennett Fitts.   This originally appeared in Malibu Canyon House with a View.

    For a couple living in a 900-square-foot house in Malibu, architect Bruce Bolander created a colorful, laminate-clad wall of storage that stretches seamlessly from the kitchen—where it holds a full-size built-in Sub-Zero refrigerator and freezer, a Miele dishwasher, a Bosch cooktop, and a tiny convection oven—to the bedroom, where it contains the couple’s clothing, shoes, and linens. In such a small space “you have to organize, and every piece takes a decision,” says resident Heidi Wright. The couple keep things they use less frequently, like guest bedding, in the higher cabinets. Photo by J Bennett Fitts.

     

    Photo by J Bennett Fitts.
    This originally appeared in Malibu Canyon House with a View.
  • 
  The bedroom in this Sydney house contains an ingenious closet system similar to library stacks. These large sliding cabinets open up to make way for the residents as they hang their clothes or access anything else kept in storage. Photo by Roger D'Souza.   Photo by Roger D'Souza.   This originally appeared in A Measured Approach.
    The bedroom in this Sydney house contains an ingenious closet system similar to library stacks. These large sliding cabinets open up to make way for the residents as they hang their clothes or access anything else kept in storage. Photo by Roger D'Souza.

     

    Photo by Roger D'Souza.
    This originally appeared in A Measured Approach.
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  Interior designer and avid furniture collector Kathryn Tyler built her home in southwest England around the vintage pieces she’d amassed over a decade. To stash coats (and keep her to-do list in order), Tyler created a built-in closet with a chalkboard surface. Photo by Andrew Meredith.  Photo by Andrew Meredith. Courtesy of Andrew Meredith 2007.  This originally appeared in English Designer's Live/Work Home .

    Interior designer and avid furniture collector Kathryn Tyler built her home in southwest England around the vintage pieces she’d amassed over a decade. To stash coats (and keep her to-do list in order), Tyler created a built-in closet with a chalkboard surface. Photo by Andrew Meredith.

    Photo by Andrew Meredith. Courtesy of Andrew Meredith 2007.
    This originally appeared in English Designer's Live/Work Home .
  • 
  Living small is par for the course in New York City, but accommodating a family of four in under 700 square feet rarely looks as effortless as in this storage-smart renovation. In the master bedroom, storage under the bed and floor hides clutter. Photo by Raimund Koch.   Photo by Raimund Koch.   This originally appeared in Storage-Smart Renovation in New York City.

    Living small is par for the course in New York City, but accommodating a family of four in under 700 square feet rarely looks as effortless as in this storage-smart renovation. In the master bedroom, storage under the bed and floor hides clutter. Photo by Raimund Koch.

     

    Photo by Raimund Koch.
    This originally appeared in Storage-Smart Renovation in New York City.
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