5 More Cool Kitchen Islands

written by:
September 2, 2013
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  Collector Jean-Christophe Aumas designed his kitchen island, which is covered in marble tiles from Carrelages du Marais—the geometric floor tiles are from the same place—and strung the matrix of lights up above it. The barstools by Charlotte Perriand were discovered in a vintage store in Antwerp, Belgium. The green wall is covered in paint from Emery & Cie. Photo by Christian Schaulin  Photo by Christian Schaulin.   This originally appeared in A Furniture Collector's Renovated Flat in Paris.

    Collector Jean-Christophe Aumas designed his kitchen island, which is covered in marble tiles from Carrelages du Marais—the geometric floor tiles are from the same place—and strung the matrix of lights up above it. The barstools by Charlotte Perriand were discovered in a vintage store in Antwerp, Belgium. The green wall is covered in paint from Emery & Cie. Photo by Christian Schaulin

    Photo by Christian Schaulin.
    This originally appeared in A Furniture Collector's Renovated Flat in Paris.
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  In a renovated Italian villa, a sleek stainless-steel island contrasts the rustic materials. Photo by: Francesco Bolis  Photo by Francesco Bolis.   This originally appeared in Modern Meets Ancient in a Renovated Italian Vacation Home.

    In a renovated Italian villa, a sleek stainless-steel island contrasts the rustic materials. Photo by: Francesco Bolis

    Photo by Francesco Bolis.
    This originally appeared in Modern Meets Ancient in a Renovated Italian Vacation Home.
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  A house in India features a limestone floor and a natural wood–clad island.  Photo by Christian Schaulin.

    A house in India features a limestone floor and a natural wood–clad island.

    Photo by Christian Schaulin.
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  In the kitchen of a Toronto live-work residence, the continuous kitchen worktop and table are made of marble from Caledonia Marble. The pink Tamatik dining chairs are by Connie Chisholm and are from the Canadian design shop Made. The Blinding Love pendant lights are by Periphere, which has shops in Montreal and Toronto. The iron rails were inspired both by screens the couple had seen on their travels in the Middle East and by the ornate wrought ironwork favored by their Portuguese neighbors. Barzel Ironworks fabricated the banister to Sawatzky’s design by slicing up iron pipe, welding it, and painting it. Photo by Naomi Finlay  Photo by Naomi Finlay.   This originally appeared in Converting a Commercial Storefront to a Home (and Studio!).

    In the kitchen of a Toronto live-work residence, the continuous kitchen worktop and table are made of marble from Caledonia Marble. The pink Tamatik dining chairs are by Connie Chisholm and are from the Canadian design shop Made. The Blinding Love pendant lights are by Periphere, which has shops in Montreal and Toronto. The iron rails were inspired both by screens the couple had seen on their travels in the Middle East and by the ornate wrought ironwork favored by their Portuguese neighbors. Barzel Ironworks fabricated the banister to Sawatzky’s design by slicing up iron pipe, welding it, and painting it. Photo by Naomi Finlay

    Photo by Naomi Finlay.
    This originally appeared in Converting a Commercial Storefront to a Home (and Studio!).
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  In a New Zealand house, the showstopping ceiling’s herringbone pattern is echoed by the terra-cotta tiles on the floor. Architect Michael O’Sullivan, who designed the steel-and-glass kitchen cabinets, the table, and the pendant lights (made by Lava Glass), further amped up the richness of the room by specifying an onyx kitchen island. Interior designer Yvette Jay, a collaborator and classmate of O’Sullivan, kept her material palette “tight and limited. I had to restrict myself so that everything here ties in with the architecture.” Photo by Emily Andrew  Photo by Emily Andrews.   This originally appeared in Inside Addition.

    In a New Zealand house, the showstopping ceiling’s herringbone pattern is echoed by the terra-cotta tiles on the floor. Architect Michael O’Sullivan, who designed the steel-and-glass kitchen cabinets, the table, and the pendant lights (made by Lava Glass), further amped up the richness of the room by specifying an onyx kitchen island. Interior designer Yvette Jay, a collaborator and classmate of O’Sullivan, kept her material palette “tight and limited. I had to restrict myself so that everything here ties in with the architecture.” Photo by Emily Andrew

    Photo by Emily Andrews.
    This originally appeared in Inside Addition.
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