10 Ways to Use Benches

written by:
September 10, 2013
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  A built-in bench helped architect Davor Popadich keep costs down for his New Zealand abode and adds a distinctive look to the interior. "I detailed the house so its construction would involve as few tradespeople as possible," he says. "For example, the internal doors, the built-in seats, and the bathroom and kitchen cupboards were all made onsite by the builder—and the built-in seats saved us money on furniture." Photo by: Simon Devitt

    A built-in bench helped architect Davor Popadich keep costs down for his New Zealand abode and adds a distinctive look to the interior. "I detailed the house so its construction would involve as few tradespeople as possible," he says. "For example, the internal doors, the built-in seats, and the bathroom and kitchen cupboards were all made onsite by the builder—and the built-in seats saved us money on furniture." Photo by: Simon Devitt

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  Manhattan apartments are notoriously tight on square footage so resident Michael Pozner added a bench to his shower to get extra mileage from the space. "I got rid of the bathtub because I like the idea of a big shower,” Pozner explains. But to achieve a comparable effect, he installed a teak bench from Waterworks on the rear shower wall. “One of the things I like about a bath is that you can soak. Here I can sit and have the water pound on me—it’s a hybrid shower and bath.” Photo by Raimund Koch.  Photo by Raimund Koch.   This originally appeared in The Manhattan Transformation.

    Manhattan apartments are notoriously tight on square footage so resident Michael Pozner added a bench to his shower to get extra mileage from the space. "I got rid of the bathtub because I like the idea of a big shower,” Pozner explains. But to achieve a comparable effect, he installed a teak bench from Waterworks on the rear shower wall. “One of the things I like about a bath is that you can soak. Here I can sit and have the water pound on me—it’s a hybrid shower and bath.” Photo by Raimund Koch.

    Photo by Raimund Koch.
    This originally appeared in The Manhattan Transformation.
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  In the living room of a Knoxville house, a bench offers a cozy spot to sit. Photo by: Hollis Bennet  Photo by Hollis Bennett.   This originally appeared in Spirit of the South.

    In the living room of a Knoxville house, a bench offers a cozy spot to sit. Photo by: Hollis Bennet

    Photo by Hollis Bennett.
    This originally appeared in Spirit of the South.
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  In the patio of a Manhattan Beach house, an ipe bench adds a warm contrast to the concrete pavers and Willy Guhl Loop chairs. Resident Matt Jacobsen designed it with architect Michael Lee. Photo by: Dave Lauridsen  Photo by Dave Lauridsen.   This originally appeared in Basic Instincts.

    In the patio of a Manhattan Beach house, an ipe bench adds a warm contrast to the concrete pavers and Willy Guhl Loop chairs. Resident Matt Jacobsen designed it with architect Michael Lee. Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    Photo by Dave Lauridsen.
    This originally appeared in Basic Instincts.
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  20 people can sit around the dining table in Carl Turner's renovated barn in Norfolk, England, thanks to the benches he custom built from oriented strand board. Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist  Photo by Christoffer Rudquist.   This originally appeared in Barns Ennobled.

    20 people can sit around the dining table in Carl Turner's renovated barn in Norfolk, England, thanks to the benches he custom built from oriented strand board. Photo by: Christoffer Rudquist

    Photo by Christoffer Rudquist.
    This originally appeared in Barns Ennobled.
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  A narrow hallway in a Manhattan apartment becomes a dining room thanks to a bench with hidden storage beneath the seats. Eazy side chairs by Whiteonwhite line one side of the custom-designed table by architecture firm LOT-EK. Castore suspension lights by Michele De Lucchi for Artemide hang above, and a custom rug by Liora Manné lies below. Photo by Nicholas Calcott.  Photo by Nicholas Calcott.   This originally appeared in Tunnel Vision.

    A narrow hallway in a Manhattan apartment becomes a dining room thanks to a bench with hidden storage beneath the seats. Eazy side chairs by Whiteonwhite line one side of the custom-designed table by architecture firm LOT-EK. Castore suspension lights by Michele De Lucchi for Artemide hang above, and a custom rug by Liora Manné lies below. Photo by Nicholas Calcott.

    Photo by Nicholas Calcott.
    This originally appeared in Tunnel Vision.
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  In a renovated Brooklyn apartment, architecture and design firm Workstead's wall-mounted lamps illuminate a photo from Cloud Series by Matthew Williams. The bench is by Hugh Acton. Photo by: Matthew Williams  Photo by Matthew Williams. Courtesy of matthew williams.  This originally appeared in Minimalist Brooklyn Apartment .

    In a renovated Brooklyn apartment, architecture and design firm Workstead's wall-mounted lamps illuminate a photo from Cloud Series by Matthew Williams. The bench is by Hugh Acton. Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Photo by Matthew Williams. Courtesy of matthew williams.
    This originally appeared in Minimalist Brooklyn Apartment .
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  In keeping with Jaime Hayon’s goal of creating a serene and airy home, the master bedroom and sticks to a mostly neutral palette of whites and grays. The bench by the bed is a custom piece designed by Hayon and his wife Nienke Klunder and fabricated by their carpenter friend Josep Joffre. Photo by Nienke Klunder.  Photo by Nienke Klunder.   This originally appeared in Designer Jaime Hayon's Renovated Home in Spain.

    In keeping with Jaime Hayon’s goal of creating a serene and airy home, the master bedroom and sticks to a mostly neutral palette of whites and grays. The bench by the bed is a custom piece designed by Hayon and his wife Nienke Klunder and fabricated by their carpenter friend Josep Joffre. Photo by Nienke Klunder.

    Photo by Nienke Klunder.
    This originally appeared in Designer Jaime Hayon's Renovated Home in Spain.
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  A padded steel-and-metal bench runs the width of the living room in a modern vacation home, crossing below the television and in front of a ten-foot-high window. Despite the many design compromises resident Nancy Church had to make to accommodate her limited budget, "windows were the only items not up for discussion... they were the most costly items in the house." Photo by David Robert Elliot.  Photo by David Robert Elliot.   This originally appeared in Come Sail Away.

    A padded steel-and-metal bench runs the width of the living room in a modern vacation home, crossing below the television and in front of a ten-foot-high window. Despite the many design compromises resident Nancy Church had to make to accommodate her limited budget, "windows were the only items not up for discussion... they were the most costly items in the house." Photo by David Robert Elliot.

    Photo by David Robert Elliot.
    This originally appeared in Come Sail Away.
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  An aluminum bench harmonizes with the industrial nature of the galvanized-steel walls and the polished concrete floor within a metal broker's Collingwood, Ontario, house. Photo by Lorne Bridgman.  Photo by Lorne Bridgman. Courtesy of Nancy Alonzo.  This originally appeared in Scrap House.

    An aluminum bench harmonizes with the industrial nature of the galvanized-steel walls and the polished concrete floor within a metal broker's Collingwood, Ontario, house. Photo by Lorne Bridgman.

    Photo by Lorne Bridgman. Courtesy of Nancy Alonzo.
    This originally appeared in Scrap House.
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