10 Examples of Shipping Container Architecture

written by:
June 10, 2014
They’re not just for global shipping anymore: These creative adaptations think inside the box. Read Full Article
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  Bharathi Research Station (Antarctica)
Resembling a space station from a vintage ‘60s sci-fi film, this incredible creation by Germany’s BOF Architects inhabits another extreme environment, a coastal hillside on the bottom of the globe. Built to house researchers from India, this structure is easily removable to lessen environmental impact.
Photo by BOF Architects
    Bharathi Research Station (Antarctica)

    Resembling a space station from a vintage ‘60s sci-fi film, this incredible creation by Germany’s BOF Architects inhabits another extreme environment, a coastal hillside on the bottom of the globe. Built to house researchers from India, this structure is easily removable to lessen environmental impact.

    Photo by BOF Architects

  • 
  Treehouse (Jerusalem, Israel)
Literally a growing structure—two pines grow through porches on either end of the rustic home—this treehouse by Golany Architects provides a stark contrast to the industrial aesthetic often associated with shipping container construction. 
Photo by Golany Architects
    Treehouse (Jerusalem, Israel)

    Literally a growing structure—two pines grow through porches on either end of the rustic home—this treehouse by Golany Architects provides a stark contrast to the industrial aesthetic often associated with shipping container construction.

    Photo by Golany Architects

  • 
  Decameron (Sao Paulo, Brazil)
Architects Marcio Kogan and Mariana Simas of Studio MK27 turned an empty urban alley into a neon-drenched retreat, complete with a small garden, by repurposing shipping containers.
Photo by Pedro Vannucchi
    Decameron (Sao Paulo, Brazil)

    Architects Marcio Kogan and Mariana Simas of Studio MK27 turned an empty urban alley into a neon-drenched retreat, complete with a small garden, by repurposing shipping containers.

    Photo by Pedro Vannucchi

  • 
  CC4441 (Tokyo, Japan)
Tomokazu Hayakawa sliced and stacked two black containers to create an angular art gallery and office space in the Taito district.
Photo by Kuniaki Sasage
    CC4441 (Tokyo, Japan)

    Tomokazu Hayakawa sliced and stacked two black containers to create an angular art gallery and office space in the Taito district.

    Photo by Kuniaki Sasage

  • 
  Shipping Container Home (Brisbane, Australia)
Architect and designer Todd Miller didn’t just use a shipping container for this home—it appears like he used an entire shipping company, since it took 31 containers to build this industrial but inviting home, which features a massive graffiti mural on the back wall. 
Photo by ZieglerBuild
    Shipping Container Home (Brisbane, Australia)

    Architect and designer Todd Miller didn’t just use a shipping container for this home—it appears like he used an entire shipping company, since it took 31 containers to build this industrial but inviting home, which features a massive graffiti mural on the back wall.

    Photo by ZieglerBuild

  • 
  Container Bar (Austin, Texas)
Years in the making, this stacked watering hole on Austin’s Rainey street has been a huge hit since opening earlier this year, and a soon-to-follow food truck should only bring in more business (and make it more spatially similar). While tap beer is often prefered, this seems like a rare time when canned beer might make more sense. 
Photo by North Arrow Studio
    Container Bar (Austin, Texas)

    Years in the making, this stacked watering hole on Austin’s Rainey street has been a huge hit since opening earlier this year, and a soon-to-follow food truck should only bring in more business (and make it more spatially similar). While tap beer is often prefered, this seems like a rare time when canned beer might make more sense.

    Photo by North Arrow Studio

  • 
  New Jerusalem Orphanage (Johannesburg, South Africa)
4D and A Architects used more than two dozen containers to help give this institution a more expansive, and inexpensive, home. Beyond the incredible service this structure provides, the use of space and the varied angles of each container give it a compelling modernist look.  
Photo by Dennis Guichard
    New Jerusalem Orphanage (Johannesburg, South Africa)

    4D and A Architects used more than two dozen containers to help give this institution a more expansive, and inexpensive, home. Beyond the incredible service this structure provides, the use of space and the varied angles of each container give it a compelling modernist look.

    Photo by Dennis Guichard

  • 
  Starbucks Drive-Thru (Chicago, Illinois)
This demi-sized, 700-square-foot coffee shop in Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood is one of a growing number of modular experiments from the big chain. This LEED-certified structure is hopefully a play towards better building practices as opposed to a means to plop a store on any available space.
    Starbucks Drive-Thru (Chicago, Illinois)

    This demi-sized, 700-square-foot coffee shop in Chicago’s Rogers Park neighborhood is one of a growing number of modular experiments from the big chain. This LEED-certified structure is hopefully a play towards better building practices as opposed to a means to plop a store on any available space.

  • 
  WFH House (Wuxi, China)
Copenhagen-based Arcgency made something special out of a rigid skeleton of shipping containers—a gorgeous, bamboo-clad modular home that offers stylish customization options and environmental features (solar cells, water cistern, green roof) that push this project beyond mere recycling. 
Photo by Arcgenvy
    WFH House (Wuxi, China)

    Copenhagen-based Arcgency made something special out of a rigid skeleton of shipping containers—a gorgeous, bamboo-clad modular home that offers stylish customization options and environmental features (solar cells, water cistern, green roof) that push this project beyond mere recycling.

    Photo by Arcgenvy

  • 
  Mill Junction Student Housing (Johannesburg, South Africa) 
The developers at Citiq decided to one-up anybody reclaiming and reusing building material by fashioning an 11-story dorm out of shipping containers and abandoned grain silos. This colorful space near the city’s central business district accommodates nearly 400 students in a mish-mash of metal shapes. 
Photo by Citiq
    Mill Junction Student Housing (Johannesburg, South Africa)

    The developers at Citiq decided to one-up anybody reclaiming and reusing building material by fashioning an 11-story dorm out of shipping containers and abandoned grain silos. This colorful space near the city’s central business district accommodates nearly 400 students in a mish-mash of metal shapes.

    Photo by Citiq

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