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10 clever storage ideas for the bathroom

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Flummoxed by the ever-present need for storage in the bathroom? Here are 10 ways to stash all your bath supplies in a modern way.
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  In this gallery and residence in Antwerp, Veerle Wenes asked artists from Studio Simple to devise an imaginative storage solution for the bathroom. Starting at one end of the room and working their way across, the team assembled chests and cabinets found at a thrift shop and painted them all white. “It’s like a mosaic,” says Wenes. “It’s a very personalized concept—I feel like it’s my bathroom.” Photo by Tim Van de Velde.  Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

    In this gallery and residence in Antwerp, Veerle Wenes asked artists from Studio Simple to devise an imaginative storage solution for the bathroom. Starting at one end of the room and working their way across, the team assembled chests and cabinets found at a thrift shop and painted them all white. “It’s like a mosaic,” says Wenes. “It’s a very personalized concept—I feel like it’s my bathroom.” Photo by Tim Van de Velde.

    Photo by: Tim Van de Velde

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  In the bathroom of a downtown Los Angeles apartment reimagined by the architecture firm Tag Front, the Stylo bar by Alu eliminates the need for space-eating cabinets by creating a vertical tower of platforms on which all the hygienic essentials rest. Generally used in retail displays, the Stylo stretches from floor to ceiling; platforms branch off at various intervals, creating resting spots for toilet paper, shaving gear, toothpaste, soap, and other necessities. Photo by Baerbel Schmidt.  Photo by: Baerbel Schmidt

    In the bathroom of a downtown Los Angeles apartment reimagined by the architecture firm Tag Front, the Stylo bar by Alu eliminates the need for space-eating cabinets by creating a vertical tower of platforms on which all the hygienic essentials rest. Generally used in retail displays, the Stylo stretches from floor to ceiling; platforms branch off at various intervals, creating resting spots for toilet paper, shaving gear, toothpaste, soap, and other necessities. Photo by Baerbel Schmidt.

    Photo by: Baerbel Schmidt

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  In the bathroom of “eco-designer” Petz Scholtus’s residence in Barcelona, Spain, four swing towel racks are better than one, and space-saving plastic pockets line a vertical slice of wall. Photo by Carmen Masia Martorell.  Photo by: Carmen Masia Martorell

    In the bathroom of “eco-designer” Petz Scholtus’s residence in Barcelona, Spain, four swing towel racks are better than one, and space-saving plastic pockets line a vertical slice of wall. Photo by Carmen Masia Martorell.

    Photo by: Carmen Masia Martorell

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  Designed and built in 1878 for Judge John Murphy, a 4,400-square-foot white structure has, from the outside, the undeniable characteristics of a classic San Francisco Victorian. The master bathroom used to be a tiny kitchen in what was once a tiny apartment. The cabinets were designed by Nilus de Matran and fabricated by George Slack; one cubby was left open for easy access to towels. With enough room in the shower for a small stool, products are within easy reach. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.  Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

    Designed and built in 1878 for Judge John Murphy, a 4,400-square-foot white structure has, from the outside, the undeniable characteristics of a classic San Francisco Victorian. The master bathroom used to be a tiny kitchen in what was once a tiny apartment. The cabinets were designed by Nilus de Matran and fabricated by George Slack; one cubby was left open for easy access to towels. With enough room in the shower for a small stool, products are within easy reach. Photo by Dave Lauridsen.

    Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

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  All of the money Barbara Hill poured into remodeling her 1960s condo in Houston was spent taking things out—and she couldn’t be happier. The door to Hill's medicine cabinet, made by George Sacaris, slides open to reveal a concrete wall, an extra outlet, and a cubby for product storage. Photo by Dean Kaufman.  Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    All of the money Barbara Hill poured into remodeling her 1960s condo in Houston was spent taking things out—and she couldn’t be happier. The door to Hill's medicine cabinet, made by George Sacaris, slides open to reveal a concrete wall, an extra outlet, and a cubby for product storage. Photo by Dean Kaufman.

    Photo by: Dean Kaufman

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  A couple in Brooklyn rehabilitated their 19th-century tenement to reveal decades of layers and scores of possibilities. Meant to inspire those of us who love their tile and don't have a huge need for storage, this recess in the upper-level bathroom allows for many a bath product to be tucked in and is rendered nearly invisible among the tiles, painstakingly fired by one of the residents. Photo by Paul Barbera.  Photo by: Paul BarberaCourtesy of: Paul Barbera

    A couple in Brooklyn rehabilitated their 19th-century tenement to reveal decades of layers and scores of possibilities. Meant to inspire those of us who love their tile and don't have a huge need for storage, this recess in the upper-level bathroom allows for many a bath product to be tucked in and is rendered nearly invisible among the tiles, painstakingly fired by one of the residents. Photo by Paul Barbera.

    Photo by: Paul Barbera

    Courtesy of: Paul Barbera

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  At first glance, the narrow bathroom of this house in southeastern Australia designed by architect Shane Blue appears much larger thanks to a large mirrored cabinet along one wall, providing much-needed storage space above a small shelf that gives the residents easy access to things they reach for every day.

    At first glance, the narrow bathroom of this house in southeastern Australia designed by architect Shane Blue appears much larger thanks to a large mirrored cabinet along one wall, providing much-needed storage space above a small shelf that gives the residents easy access to things they reach for every day.

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  A renovated Belgian water tower provides unprecedented opportunities for out-of-the-box thinking. A case in point: the guest bedroom-office-bathroom on the third floor employs floor-to-ceiling curtains to hide all storage in the open space and create a serene ambience for the bather. The tub is by Rapsel. Photo by Tim Van de Velde.

    A renovated Belgian water tower provides unprecedented opportunities for out-of-the-box thinking. A case in point: the guest bedroom-office-bathroom on the third floor employs floor-to-ceiling curtains to hide all storage in the open space and create a serene ambience for the bather. The tub is by Rapsel. Photo by Tim Van de Velde.

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  Mirror, mirror: For the bathroom of their Victorian terrace house in London, self-proclaimed neat freaks Bruce Thatcher and Kirsty Leighton asked their architect, William Tozer, for an entire wall in their bathroom that opens to reveal a cabinet that is exactly the depth of a fat roll of toilet paper. Photo by Matthew Williams.  Photo by: Matthew Williams

    Mirror, mirror: For the bathroom of their Victorian terrace house in London, self-proclaimed neat freaks Bruce Thatcher and Kirsty Leighton asked their architect, William Tozer, for an entire wall in their bathroom that opens to reveal a cabinet that is exactly the depth of a fat roll of toilet paper. Photo by Matthew Williams.

    Photo by: Matthew Williams

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  Minimalist doesn't have to mean monochromatic or marble. The Gaboon-plywood walls of the McKenzie residence in New Zealand flow through into the bathroom without a door to get in the way. Photo by Patrick Reynolds.  Photo by: Patrick Reynolds

    Minimalist doesn't have to mean monochromatic or marble. The Gaboon-plywood walls of the McKenzie residence in New Zealand flow through into the bathroom without a door to get in the way. Photo by Patrick Reynolds.

    Photo by: Patrick Reynolds

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