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March 11, 2014
Carving out a study niche doesn't mean adding on an extension to your house; instead, consider built-ins—they can change the entire function of a room, or simply create some much-needed workspace.
Perforated screen in Manhattan apartment

An example of multitasking at its best, the two designers of Normal Projects knocked down most of this apartment’s walls in order to combine kitchen storage, a closet, a bar, a bed, and a home office into a blue-lacquered cabinetry unit in the center of the room. Photo by Raimund Koch.

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Originally appeared in Space-Efficient Renovation in New York
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Stacked wood shelving unit in office

For this home in Canada, designed for his colleague at Bocci, Omer Arbel reproduced his shelving unit "1.1," his first work, to house the owners' vinyl collection and home office detritus. Photo by Jason Schmidt.

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Originally appeared in Modern Angular Rural Family Home in Canada
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modern CNC-milled desk in London home

For this not-so-average office built-in, architect Alvin Huang and his team created a digitally fabricated design that boasts secret compartments for coralling the trappings of a modern workspace. Photo by James Day.

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Originally appeared in Hidden in Plain View
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A second bedroom was converted into a home office/dining room. A Dieter Rams 606 Universal Shelving System lines the wall. Perhaps the most eye-catching item 
in the room is the light fixture that hangs over their Swedish dining table. Patrick Townsend, t

Dwell's creative direcotr, Jeanette Abbink, shares this home office with her husband, Mike, also a graphic designer. The Abbinks added an entire wall of Dieter Rams 606 Universal Shelving System to help convert their second bedroom into a home office. Photo by Dean Kaufman.

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Originally appeared in Creative Renovation in Brooklyn
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Materials and craft play a significant role inside and out. The columns are Type 316 stainless steel – almost nautical grade. Floors and walls are walnut; windows are mahogany.

A 172-square-foot treehouse functions as a home office thanks to built-in desks and storage. The columns are Type 316 stainless steel–almost nautical grade; floors and walls are walnut; windows are mahogany. Photo by Eric Staudenmaier.

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Originally appeared in An Atypical Tree House
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Creatively organized library with multiple bookshelves

In southwest England, interior designer and avid furniture collector Kathryn Tyler added clerestory windows above built-in bookshelves and flat files in her home's design studio. Photo by Andrew Meredith.

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Courtesy of 
Andrew Meredith 2007
Originally appeared in English Designer's Live/Work Home
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Perforated screen in Manhattan apartment

An example of multitasking at its best, the two designers of Normal Projects knocked down most of this apartment’s walls in order to combine kitchen storage, a closet, a bar, a bed, and a home office into a blue-lacquered cabinetry unit in the center of the room. Photo by Raimund Koch.

Photo by Raimund Koch.

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