written by:
September 19, 2013
From a striking catwalk to a glass-walled skybridge, we cover walkways and platforms the span great divides.
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  On a gently sloping lot in the middle of a pine forest at the northern edge of Cuernavaca, Mexico, is a family compound with an addition conceptualized by local architect Alfredo Raymundo Cano Briceño of T3arc. Linked to the 1,300-square-foot main house by a glass-covered footbridge, the addition, which measures just under 500 square feet, includes three bedrooms and one bathroom.

    On a gently sloping lot in the middle of a pine forest at the northern edge of Cuernavaca, Mexico, is a family compound with an addition conceptualized by local architect Alfredo Raymundo Cano Briceño of T3arc. Linked to the 1,300-square-foot main house by a glass-covered footbridge, the addition, which measures just under 500 square feet, includes three bedrooms and one bathroom.

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  Nestled into the hillside and largely concealed from view, the Richard Meier–designed Douglas House is accessed via a footbridge that leads to the house’s uppermost level. Upon entering, the visitor descends to the lower floors via a winding staircase. Photo by: Dean Kaufman  Photo by Dean Kaufman. Courtesy of © Dean Kaufman 2011 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

    Nestled into the hillside and largely concealed from view, the Richard Meier–designed Douglas House is accessed via a footbridge that leads to the house’s uppermost level. Upon entering, the visitor descends to the lower floors via a winding staircase. Photo by: Dean Kaufman

    Photo by Dean Kaufman. Courtesy of © Dean Kaufman 2011 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
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  The buildings in an Austin house are connected by a glass-walled hallway that bridges a reflecting pool and water garden and there is an abundance of over-sized sliding windows, doors, and glass panels to blur the line between the built environment and the natural one. Photo by: Denise Prince Martin  Photo by Denise Prince Martin.

    The buildings in an Austin house are connected by a glass-walled hallway that bridges a reflecting pool and water garden and there is an abundance of over-sized sliding windows, doors, and glass panels to blur the line between the built environment and the natural one. Photo by: Denise Prince Martin

    Photo by Denise Prince Martin.
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  An heir of the Dow Chemical fortune and a pupil at Taliesin, Alden B. Dow (1904–1983) lived most of his 79 years in Midland, Michigan. Over the course of a career that spanned five decades, he completed over 100 buildings there, including his own house and studio. He designed this ziggurat-like bridge in the surrounding gardens.

    An heir of the Dow Chemical fortune and a pupil at Taliesin, Alden B. Dow (1904–1983) lived most of his 79 years in Midland, Michigan. Over the course of a career that spanned five decades, he completed over 100 buildings there, including his own house and studio. He designed this ziggurat-like bridge in the surrounding gardens.

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  Rising to a catwalk above, a huge glass-and-steel central stair envisioned by the architect spans four floors of a renovated farmhouse in the Italian countryside. Photo by Helenio Barbetta.  Photo by Helenio Barbetta.

    Rising to a catwalk above, a huge glass-and-steel central stair envisioned by the architect spans four floors of a renovated farmhouse in the Italian countryside. Photo by Helenio Barbetta.

    Photo by Helenio Barbetta.
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  A skybridge connects two halves of a house designed by late architect David Boone. The house hunches into the hill, perched on metal I-beams and concrete piers, nestled into a hillside with views of Mount Diablo. It’s about 2,800 square feet and consists of two identical slant-roofed boxes: an office, kitchen, and living room (in Boone’s day a bit of corporate entertaining certainly counted as billable hours) in one; bedrooms in the other with a studio below. Photo by Noah Webb  Photo by Noah Webb.

    A skybridge connects two halves of a house designed by late architect David Boone. The house hunches into the hill, perched on metal I-beams and concrete piers, nestled into a hillside with views of Mount Diablo. It’s about 2,800 square feet and consists of two identical slant-roofed boxes: an office, kitchen, and living room (in Boone’s day a bit of corporate entertaining certainly counted as billable hours) in one; bedrooms in the other with a studio below. Photo by Noah Webb

    Photo by Noah Webb.
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  To discover more bridges, read our "Bridges We Love" story.
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On a gently sloping lot in the middle of a pine forest at the northern edge of Cuernavaca, Mexico, is a family compound with an addition conceptualized by local architect Alfredo Raymundo Cano Briceño of T3arc. Linked to the 1,300-square-foot main house by a glass-covered footbridge, the addition, which measures just under 500 square feet, includes three bedrooms and one bathroom.

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