written by:
November 12, 2013
In the following slideshow, spy seven ways that architects and designers crafted their structures around trees.
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  A house built in Japan features an internal courtyard, which the residents liken to a nest.  Photo by Hiroshi Ueda.   This originally appeared in Back to Nature.

    A house built in Japan features an internal courtyard, which the residents liken to a nest.

    Photo by Hiroshi Ueda.
    This originally appeared in Back to Nature.
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  A young, drought-tolerant Tristania conferta (also known as Australian brush box tree) grows up through the chill-out room under the deck at the rear of a house in Los Angeles. Photo by Tom Fowlks.  Photo by Tom Fowlks.   This originally appeared in Casa Study House #1.

    A young, drought-tolerant Tristania conferta (also known as Australian brush box tree) grows up through the chill-out room under the deck at the rear of a house in Los Angeles. Photo by Tom Fowlks.

    Photo by Tom Fowlks.
    This originally appeared in Casa Study House #1.
  • 
  A 300-year-old beech tree supplies shade, movement, sound, and color to the site, and provides a towering natural counterpoint to a house architect Dieter Van Everbroeck renovated in Ghent. Photo by Hertha Hernaus.  Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.   This originally appeared in The Tree of Ghent.

    A 300-year-old beech tree supplies shade, movement, sound, and color to the site, and provides a towering natural counterpoint to a house architect Dieter Van Everbroeck renovated in Ghent. Photo by Hertha Hernaus.

    Photo by Hertha Hurnaus.
    This originally appeared in The Tree of Ghent.
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  In a tiny 653-square-foot house in Tokyo, a 20-foot-high garden room brings a sense of the outdoors in. A centrally positioned evergreen ash anchors the airy terrace, which is paved with complementary gray bricks.  Courtesy of (c) DAICI ANO / FWD.  This originally appeared in Great Indoors.

    In a tiny 653-square-foot house in Tokyo, a 20-foot-high garden room brings a sense of the outdoors in. A centrally positioned evergreen ash anchors the airy terrace, which is paved with complementary gray bricks.

    Courtesy of (c) DAICI ANO / FWD.
    This originally appeared in Great Indoors.
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  House 2.0 relies on recycled wood for support—notably, two enormous former mooring posts of basralocus wood and an entire elm tree, which supports the suspended living room. Photo by Hans Peter Follmi.  Photo by Hans Peter Follmi . Courtesy of I See For You © Föllmi Photography.  This originally appeared in Second to None .

    House 2.0 relies on recycled wood for support—notably, two enormous former mooring posts of basralocus wood and an entire elm tree, which supports the suspended living room. Photo by Hans Peter Follmi.

    Photo by Hans Peter Follmi . Courtesy of I See For You © Föllmi Photography.
    This originally appeared in Second to None .
  • 
  Despite the challenges a pine tree’s location presented, architect Daniel Monti never considered removing it from its native Venice, California, location. “The pine tree is such a special piece of the lot that you can’t help but fall in love with it,” says Monti. Instead, he worked around it to create a three-bedroom 2,700-square-foot home that echoes the beauty of that majestic age-old tree.  Photo by Benny Chan. Courtesy of © fotoworks.  This originally appeared in The Giving Tree.

    Despite the challenges a pine tree’s location presented, architect Daniel Monti never considered removing it from its native Venice, California, location. “The pine tree is such a special piece of the lot that you can’t help but fall in love with it,” says Monti. Instead, he worked around it to create a three-bedroom 2,700-square-foot home that echoes the beauty of that majestic age-old tree.

    Photo by Benny Chan. Courtesy of © fotoworks.
    This originally appeared in The Giving Tree.
  • 
  A Cor-Ten rainscreen filters dappled light through the house—an effect similar to sun shining through tree leaves.  Photo by Benny Chan. Courtesy of © fotoworks.  This originally appeared in The Giving Tree.

    A Cor-Ten rainscreen filters dappled light through the house—an effect similar to sun shining through tree leaves.

    Photo by Benny Chan. Courtesy of © fotoworks.
    This originally appeared in The Giving Tree.
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cedar and larch Japanese house with garden

A house built in Japan features an internal courtyard, which the residents liken to a nest.

Photo by Hiroshi Ueda.

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