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March 24, 2014
Festooned with color and pattern, these seven designs use tile to create striking visual effects.

Together with architect Nunzia Carbone, Italian expat Edoardo Allegranti renovated a traditional 1930s brick row house on a residential alleyway in central Shanghai. The interior features a mix of rustic and modern accents. In the bathroom, antique doors are juxtaposed against vibrant yellow and green tile, which extends seamlessly across the floor and up the walls. Photo by Christian Schaulin.

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Originally appeared in Modern Lilong House Renovation in Shanghai
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Brooklyn renovation interior bathroom

A visit to the Alhambra, in Granada, Spain, inspired the tile-clad bathroom in the Williamsburg, Brooklyn, apartment Alex Gil and Claudia DeSimio renovated. DeSimio handcrafted more than 6,000 seashell-shaped tiles for to cover the room's walls and ceiling. Photo by: Paul Barbera.

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Originally appeared in How to Design with Blue
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Italian architect Benedetta Tagliabue in her home office

In her Barcelona apartment, Benedetta Tagliabue marries old and new. Flooring made of diagonally placed rectangular patches of delightfully patterned baldosa hidráulica (tiles made with tinted cements, widely used in 19th-century homes here and in France) that reflect the sun’s rays, create “rooms of light” as Tagliabue describes them. Photo by: Gunnar Knechtel.

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Originally appeared in Arch Support
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Modern custom-tiled floor.

A carpet of custom tile created by Paola Navone punctuates a corridor on the first floor of a 200-year-old Italian farmhouse she renovated. Photo by Wichmann + Bendtsen.

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Originally appeared in Paola Navone's Industrial Style Renovation in Italy
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arctic white kitchen with exposed wood grain interior

To complement the white-washed custom cabinetry in her modern Connecticut kitchen, architect Julie Salles Schaffer designed a tile backsplash to resemble “melting butter in a white pan." Daltile arranged her two-color AutoCAD design—white and off-white—onto a mesh backing for a small fee. To soften the edges of the cabinets’ drawers and doors, Schaffer requested radial edging. Photo by Daniel Shea.

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Originally appeared in How to Design with White
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white ceramic tiles cover the back wall while green and blue chair sit around a coffee table with a blue mosaic surface on a rug with a pattern of blue squares

“There’s no right answer except to play and experiment,” Jonathan Adler says about furnishing the interior of his Shelter Island beach house. He reupholstered vintage Warren Platner chairs with velvet from Kravet. Drawings by Eva Hesse inspired the custom ceramic wall tile. Adler also created the coffee table, rug, planters, and gold stool. The pendant lamp is from Rewire in Los Angeles and the artwork is by Jean-Pierre Clément. Photo by: Floto + Warner

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Originally appeared in Jonathan Adler and Simon Doonan's Shelter Island Vacation Home
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Scandic Grand Central Coffee Bar in Stockholm

Blending two Nordic and Moorish cultures, Moroccan-inspired tile lines the floors in the cafe at Stockholm's Scandic Grand Central hotel.

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© Patrik Lindell
Originally appeared in The Scandic Grand Central, Stockholm
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Textured tiled wall with fixtures in kitchen

Lynda and Peter Benoit used seconds from Heath Ceramics to clad the backsplash in their renovated Emeryville, California, loft. Though the surfaces aren't as uniformly colored nor as flat as first-run tiles, they offer a unique tone and texture when the tiles are laid out. Photo by: Drew Kelly.

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Originally appeared in Storage Savvy Renovation in Emeryville
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shanghai surprise bathroom

Together with architect Nunzia Carbone, Italian expat Edoardo Allegranti renovated a traditional 1930s brick row house on a residential alleyway in central Shanghai. The interior features a mix of rustic and modern accents. In the bathroom, antique doors are juxtaposed against vibrant yellow and green tile, which extends seamlessly across the floor and up the walls. Photo by Christian Schaulin.

Photo by Christian Schaulin.

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