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December 2, 2013
From custom white oak cabinets to bright orange Plexiglas cubbies, these seven kitchens create thoughtful solutions to difficult space issues.

For Dawn Casale and Dave Crofton (and their new little addition), an ample, but budget-friendly kitchen was on top of the list before making the move from their previous residence in Cobble Hill to their 2,400-square-foot townhouse in Boerum Hill, as featured in our Modern for Less issue. Photo by Matthew Williams.

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Originally appeared in A Storage-Saving Salvaged Wood Kitchen in Brooklyn
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hollywood cabin loft kitchen

Mad Men’s Vincent Kartheiser has all he needs in his compact, 580-square-foot Hollywood abode. Funn Roberts worked with Kartheiser’s existing appliances in the kitchen, trading the old cabinetry for new teak. Photo by Joe Pugliese.

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Originally appeared in The Tiny Hollywood Home of Mad Men's Vincent Kartheiser
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Modern kitchen with long countertop and oak cabinetry

For a Toronto couple with a love of minimalist Japanese architecture, a sleek, storage-packed kitchen was the first priority in their home's renovation. The white oak used for the cabinets, kitchen island, and dining table is finished with double-boiled linseed oil, which can be reapplied by the homeowners as the wood mellows and patinas. Photo by Bob Gundu.

Originally appeared in Kitchen Solutions: Smart Storage Design
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Custom cut Plexiglas storage kitchen cubbies

Seeking more space and a connection with the city, an artist and a designer turn an old Toronto storefront in Dundas West into a home and studio. To keep vases, dishes, and small appliances handy but off the countertop, Sawatzky designed two niches within a wall of deep cabinets. Inset outlets supply power; butcher block lines all sides; and Plexiglas doors provide hits of bright orange. Plastic World, a local dealer, custom-cut the Plexiglas for the storage cubby which sits beneath a photo by artist Chris Curreri. Photo by Naomi Finlay.

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Originally appeared in How to Design with Orange
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Modern neon green and blue kitchen cabinets

Architect Janet Bloomberg infused a mid-century kitchen with her 21st-century taste to create a whimsical yet thoughtful new space. The eye-popping laminated cabinets are from Abet Laminati in Bloomberg's favorite colors. The gray walls are made from Viroc, a substance typically used to underlay other building materials. Photo by Greg Powers.

Originally appeared in Modern Kitchen Renovation with Mid-Century Roots
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Modern black and white minimalist Danish design kitchen

In an up-and-coming area of Copenhagen, a pair of designers and their twin girls inhabit a converted loft, filling it with serious design savvy and a hefty dose of creativity. Twin daughters Merle and Anine join their parents in the family’s kitchen, designed by Jensen for Vipp. He explains that his role as chief designer at Vipp is to “work with their DNA” by refining the company’s trademark materials: stainless steel, painted metal, and rubber. For the utilitarian kitchen, “we wanted to get the feeling of a tool,” he says. “It’s nice to have a space where you can actually work.” The gas stovetop is by ABK and the refrigerator is by Smeg; Le Perroquet spotlights are from iGuzzini. Photo by Anders Hviid.

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Originally appeared in Converted Loft Fit for a Modern Family in Copenhagen
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Kitchen with custom fabricated cabinetry.

American history lives on in a family’s Tribeca, New York, loft after a renovation by a couple of enterprising architects. Custom kitchen cabinets designed by Pulltab and fabricated by Maciek Winiarczyk hold mostly vintage ironstone that Geiger has found at flea markets and estate sales over the past 20 years. “I love white,” she says, “because I think food always looks better on it.” She also collects vintage wooden cutting boards, shown resting against the marble tile backsplash from Stone Source. Photo by João Canziani.

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Originally appeared in A Renovated Tribeca Loft with Skylight
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boerum hill townhouse kitchen 1

For Dawn Casale and Dave Crofton (and their new little addition), an ample, but budget-friendly kitchen was on top of the list before making the move from their previous residence in Cobble Hill to their 2,400-square-foot townhouse in Boerum Hill, as featured in our Modern for Less issue. Photo by Matthew Williams.

Photo by Matthew Williams.

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