written by:
August 26, 2013
What to do when a tightly cramped kitchen yearns for more space? Here, five great examples on how to win the storage battle with arguably the most trafficked room in the house.
For a <a href="http://www.dwell.com/articles/A-Clean-Slate.html">tiny Brooklyn kitchen</a>, Workstead mitigated a dire lack of counter space by wrapping the cabinetry into the living area, creating one larger, fully integrated workspace. The custom cabine

A few big ideas—and some careful workmanship—transform the very small kitchen of a one-bedroom Brooklyn apartment into an expansive space suited to a young professional with a taste for design. The designers at Workstead devised a plan to use an offset grid of cabinets as a unifying element in slate gray that moves across the room and gives it a cool quietude. The backsplash tile is from Ann Sacks.

Photo by: Jeremy Liebman

Originally appeared in Dwell's Coolest Kitchens
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Textile designer Orla Kiely's home

Long overhead cabinets hang above the stovetop and island in textile designer Orla Kiely's London home

Photo by: Chris Tubbs

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Originally appeared in At Home with Textile Designer Orla Kiely
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Kitchenware nook

In the Renaldi-Boyd Residence, a vertical tile-covered storage nook holds various pots, pans, and bric-à-brac.

Originally appeared in Academy Rewards
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Modern kitchen with Douglas-fir island and cabinets

In the kitchen of this renovated Brooklyn brownstone, the island and cabinets, fashioned from remilled Douglas-fir beams salvaged from upstate New York, sport inexpensive drawers from Ikea.

Photo by: Matthew Williams

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Originally appeared in A Budget Friendly Brownstone Renovation in Brooklyn
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Now rented out as an office/retail space, the downstairs contains a kitchen, which is fitted with Ikea lamps and steel shelving by Azevedo. For the flooring she glued down fiber-cement HardiePanel siding more commonly used for building walls, both because

7 shelves of various kitchenware, cookbooks, mini appliances, and even bottles of wine are accessible by a rolling ladder. See more of this renovated Victorian in San Francisco here.

Photo by: Dave Lauridsen

Photo by 
Originally appeared in Bay Wash
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For a <a href="http://www.dwell.com/articles/A-Clean-Slate.html">tiny Brooklyn kitchen</a>, Workstead mitigated a dire lack of counter space by wrapping the cabinetry into the living area, creating one larger, fully integrated workspace. The custom cabine

A few big ideas—and some careful workmanship—transform the very small kitchen of a one-bedroom Brooklyn apartment into an expansive space suited to a young professional with a taste for design. The designers at Workstead devised a plan to use an offset grid of cabinets as a unifying element in slate gray that moves across the room and gives it a cool quietude. The backsplash tile is from Ann Sacks.

Photo by: Jeremy Liebman

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