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September 7, 2013
These bold and modern facades take transparency—and creative use of common materials—to the next level.
The rear facade. A system of sliding glass windows and doors underscore the indoor/outdoor nature of the house.

A system of sliding glass windows and doors underscore the indoor/outdoor nature of this Sydney house. Photo by Roger D'Souza.

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Originally appeared in A Measured Approach
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Scott Stafne exterior night finished

In an unlikely mountaintop locale, Anderson Anderson Architecture crafted a home out of a complex composition of off-the-shelf components, paving new paths for the prefabricated construction industry. Looking like a jewel box at dusk, Scott Stafne’s Cantilever House rests easy in the middle of the Washington woods. With miles of hiking trails, lakes, and waterfalls to explore, Stafne’s property provides almost unlimited opportunity for outdoor adventures. The strong and sturdy house acts as a warm respite from the elements when the weather won’t cooperate, which is often—horizontal rain and whipping winds can be the norm. Photo by John Clark.

Originally appeared in Space Race
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Storefront facade with salvaged double-insulated window glass panels

What do you get when you give a couple of designers unlimited creative license on a very limited budget? For Andrew Dunbar and Zoee Astrakhan, the possibilities were limitless. For their San Francisco house, their low-cost, high-impact tour de force was a storefront facade constructed from salvaged double-insulated window glass panels arranged in a shingle pattern. Photo by Justin Fantl.

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justin fantl photography
Originally appeared in Just Redo It
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Modern house with greenhouse roofing wall
The prohibitive cost of outfitting the structure with radiant heat led Dunbar and Astrakhan to pull down the solid south-facing rear wall for additional sunlight and solar gain.
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Originally appeared in Just Redo It
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Christopher polly architect portrait exterior

The rear of the Chistopher Polly-designed Elliott Ripper house shows the most impactful design moves: Windows that allow light and air to enter the house. Breezway Altair louvers, Viridian Comfort Plus low-e glass, and Western Red Cedar–framed sliding glass doors on the ground floor and pivot stay windows on the second story allow residents to control how open or closed the house is. Photo by Brett Boardman.

Originally appeared in Space Race
5 / 5
The rear facade. A system of sliding glass windows and doors underscore the indoor/outdoor nature of the house.

A system of sliding glass windows and doors underscore the indoor/outdoor nature of this Sydney house. Photo by Roger D'Souza.

Photo by Roger D'Souza.

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