Latest Articles in Furniture & Products


Fantastic Plastics

While in Italy for a large press event regarding the 50th Salone Del Mobile, I took the opportunity to visit Kartell's headquarters in Noviglio, just outside of Milan. In a rambling campus of orange steel and glazed brick buildings designed by Ignazio Gardella and Anna Castelli Ferrieri, the company opened a corporate museum in 1999 to mark their 50th anniversary. Led by Claudio Luti since 1988, Kartell is best known for realizing a wide range of designs from an international roster of superstar designers. Less well known today is the company's history of innovation during the postwar years, and the role a select group of Italian designers and engineers would play in the 20th century's plastic revolution. What follows is a look at some of the company's outstanding vintage designs.
February 11, 2011
stockholm lr light bar

Stockholm Furniture Fair 2011: Part II

After examining the wares of the younguns over at the Greenhouse, it was time to venture into the main portion of the Stockholm Furniture Fair. As is the case with any major design show, there were rows and rows of beautiful items, scores of exhibitors busily tending to last-minute booth preperations, and a constantly growing number of people shuffling around, mouths agape. Here we present a few images captured during eight straight hours on the floor—you'll see some just-released items, some old Scandinavian favorites, and lots and lots of this country's favorite color—yellow.
February 10, 2011
Modern loft renovation in Brooklyn, New York

In the Loop

Adrian Jones lived in his top-floor loft in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg neighborhood for nine years before renovating. For a bachelor set designer, the 2,500-square-foot space was perfect: plenty of room for his studio and collections of books and art, big windows affording city views, and exposed brick tagged with graffiti.
February 10, 2011
stockholm green house

Stockholm Furniture Fair 2011: Part I

This week marks the return of the Stockholm Furniture Fair, the largest annual design event in the Nordic part of the world. Celebrating its sixtieth year in existence, the fair is hosting nearly 800 exhibitors from 30 different countries. We're kicking off our coverage of the show by featuring new works found at the Greenhouse, the portion of the fair dedicated to independent designers and students. Much like Salone Satellite in MIlan, the Greenhouse is comprised of young designers' prototypes; a juried panel makes a final selection from the many submissions that fly in from design schools both near and far. Many of today's prominent designers were discovered here, including Nendo, Front, and Folkform, and this year's jury included Anna von Schewen, Matti Klenell, David Carlsson, and Louise Campbell. Here we present a small selection of pieces on display.    
February 9, 2011
Asher Israelow

The Work of Asher Israelow

Add Asher Israelow to our list of young guns to watch. The Brooklyn resident and Rhode Island School of Design grad, who turns 28 this year, designs and builds stunning furniture with varied species of wood as his palette. Thanks to a tip from Stefanie Brechbuehler of Workstead (the firm which designed Melissa Jun's kitchen renovation featured in our March 2010 issue), we present a slideshow of Israelow's work.
February 8, 2011
Kaufmann Glasses

Kaufmann's Unbreakable Glasses

I was recently down in Los Angeles to moderate a panel on the Swiss Design Awards at the A+D Museum. There I met a 2009 award winner for product design, Sandra Kaufmann, who heads the eyewear brand Strada del Sole. Her durable, flexible sunglasses were one of the objects on display for this leg of the Swiss Design Award's world tour and in the video below she tells me precisely how they work. Thanks to Moni Fink for the expert camerawork.
February 8, 2011
Object #3, another early prototype that, while not exactly functional, informed the design of later pieces.

From Sweden: Note Design Studio

Stockholm-based Note Design Studio is like a Swedish Pee Wee's Playhouse--everything is cartoonish, playful, and very very fun. Founded in 2008, the group is comprised of a quirky mix of designers, architects and all-around creative types, and they combine their efforts to create products, interior spaces, branding for companies, and all manner of things. Their latest collection, Marginal Notes 2011, has just debuted at Stockholm Design Week, and was born from the scribbles that dotted the margins of the team's notebooks. As they tell it, one day during a strategy meeting they decided to take a break by looking at each other's doodles. From those initial sketches, odd proportions and odd configurations included, they launched a series of prototypes. In the end it became an exhibition of weird and wonderful objects. Take a look at the pieces, and the studio's charming liner notes.
February 7, 2011

Anna von Schewen

While in Vegas for Surfaces and Las Vegas Market, I had the chance to not only take in the terrific 17 Swedish Designers exhibit but also chat with Anna von Schewen and hear her lecture. She spoke about Swedish history (lamenting a lack of a design award among the Nobel prizes and reminding everyone that Pippi Longstocking was a Swedish character), Scandianvian design ("We have a philosophy of openness, simplicity, and modernity," she said, adding that "recently the focus has been less about functionality and more about emotionality"), and Swedish product innovations (like the BabyBjörn and the Peepoo single-use, biodegradable toilet bag). Here, she takes us on a tour of her own designs.
February 7, 2011
krastev nikolova

All Together Now

When Svetlin Krastev and Dessi Nikolova had their second child, they saw two options: Go broke buying a bigger apartment, or renovate their existing 620-square-foot home.
February 6, 2011