Latest Articles in Decor

The Conservatorium Hotel in Amsterdam

The Conservatorium, Amsterdam

The Conservatorium is among the newest in the European crop of design hotels. Architect Piero Lissoni has added his touch to what was originally a 19th-century bank by Dutch architect Daniel Knuttel. One of the adaptive reuse plan's boldest moves includes retaining the original facade and adding a multistory glass atrium. There, guests of the hotel can take a lounging break or dine on a meal while gazing up at one of Amsterdam's historic buildings. Due to its proximity to many of the city's museums, the hoteliers also hope that the Conservatorium also strikes a chord with locals. Arresting as the public spaces of this contemporary-meets-classic hotel are, the interior boasts all the marks of luxury accommodations: restaurants, a bar, spa and wellness center, and 129 guest rooms and suites. Let's take a look inside...
August 16, 2012
Pico Rocket by Femme Den

Product Design by Femme Den

At this point, it's virtually ingrained in the popular consciousness: “Women make up 50 percent of the population and 85 percent of purchase decisions," says Karena Cameron of Femme Den, a design collective ensconced within a thirty-year-old design consultancy Smart Design. And yet, "all the men are doing the designing without regard for our needs." Cameron aims to change that.
August 16, 2012

Wrapqarw by To-mo-ni

Designer Naoto Yoshida found a new use for scrap wood from the furniture industry in Japan: an organizer to wrangle unruly cords. The clever Wrapqarw contraption ($20–$25) comes in three sizes—small, medium, and large—to help organize everything from headphones to phone chargers to USB cables. To purchase, visit
August 15, 2012
Modern kitchen with stainless steel countertop

Party-Friendly Apartment in Toronto

Dr. Kenneth Montague’s Toronto loft is both home and art gallery—and the ultimate party house, thanks to two kitchens, a rooftop deck, and no shortage of conversation pieces.
August 9, 2012
Colorful modern coasters by Coastermatic

From Phone to Stone: Coastermatic

Instagram has created a vibrant social platform for sharing images and simply allowing millions of people to create photographs that are often more visually appealing than those typically made with a standard point-and-shoot or phone camera. A new service, Coastermatic, lets you take these previously ephemeral images and turn them into stone coasters, in sets of four.
August 2, 2012
Lisa and Emily White of Layer

Material Explorations with L.A. Firm Layer

Situated at the cross-section of architecture, art, and installation, Los Angeles–based architectural practice Layer has consistently managed to delight and surprise. Complex yet not intimidating, their work has graced experimental spaces and museums alike across Southern California, engaging visitors to see the space they inhabit in a new light. Founded in 2009 by Emily White and Lisa Little—both graduates of Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc)—Layer is unusual in that two women head up the firm, but according to the two, that only makes the venture more interesting. We chatted with White and Little to ask about their beginnings, unique challenges and what else we can look forward to from the firm.
July 31, 2012
nani rugs thumb

Nani Marquina's 25th Anniversary

Spanish rug and textile designer Nani Marquina, whose idyllic Ibiza weekend house we featured in Dwell's July/August 2012 "Designers at Home" issue, recently marked her company's 25th anniversary. To celebrate, she and her staff carried more than 60 rugs out to Virreina Square in Barcelona's Gracia district to watch the public interact with them.
July 31, 2012
Modern colorful living room with Philippe Xerri chairs and Tunisian rug

Rug Designer Nani Marquina's Serene Home in Ibiza

In a quiet corner of the famed Spanish party island, rug designer Nani Marquina and photographer Albert Font have carved out a serene, site-sensitive home.
July 31, 2012
marquina font residence bedroom

Preview 'Another Side of Ibiza'

Spanish rug designer Nani Marquina's island retreat is a feature story in our July/August "Designers at Home" issue (available on newsstands now). The structure has humble origins—it was built 150 years ago for a peasant farmer—and the architects tasked with its restoration, José Antonio Martínez Lapeña and Elías Torres, opted to keep the structure as close to the original as possible. For example, the rustic original ceiling crafted from sabina wood was removed, sanitized, restored, and fitted back in place. The home is a netural palette of whitewashed walls and earth-toned floors; however, Marquina and her husband, photographer Albert Font, brought vibrant textiles and contemporary design pieces into the mix, infusing the historic home with the present day. Check Tuesday, July 30, to read the full story.
July 30, 2012