Advertising
Advertising

You are here

Coffee Break: San Francisco's Coffee Bar

Read Article

When you walk into the Financial District's newest third-wave coffee hot spot, Coffee Bar, it may seem like you're waiting under the arch of a proscenium rather than in line for a piping hot latte. And that's the whole point. This second outpost of Coffee Bar isn't trying to be like its neighborhood original where people spend lazy Sunday afternoons (or camp out all day on their laptops); it's a stage for the process of making an espresso drink. "As the third wave movement grows, we're exploring how this experimentation affects cafe design in a deeper sense," says J. Hulett Jones, a principal at jones | haydu, the architecture firm that designed the space. "We're exploring alternative layouts which highlight the artistry that happens behind the counter." In the slideshow that follows, Jones gives us the run down on his design. All images © Bruce Damonte.

  • 
  Located at 101 Montgomery Street, the FiDi outpost of Coffee Bar is the second collaboration between owners Luigi DiRuocco and Robert Stang, and jones | haydu. The original Coffee Bar is in the Mission district of San Francisco and is a local favorite.  Photo by: Bruce DamonteCourtesy of: All rights reserved.
    Located at 101 Montgomery Street, the FiDi outpost of Coffee Bar is the second collaboration between owners Luigi DiRuocco and Robert Stang, and jones | haydu. The original Coffee Bar is in the Mission district of San Francisco and is a local favorite.

    Photo by: Bruce Damonte

    Courtesy of: All rights reserved.

  • 
  The space was originally a 500-square-foot storage room with concrete floors and a high ceiling. The main element jones | haydu added is a sculptural wooden ceiling that drapes over the space in a dramatic arch. "The owners had high expectations for the space, but a relatively low budget," says Jones. By keeping the original floors and using inexpensive plywood in a standard maple finish for the cabinetry and ceiling, the designers accomplished a striking design with a minimum of resources.  Photo by: Bruce DamonteCourtesy of: All rights reserved.
    The space was originally a 500-square-foot storage room with concrete floors and a high ceiling. The main element jones | haydu added is a sculptural wooden ceiling that drapes over the space in a dramatic arch. "The owners had high expectations for the space, but a relatively low budget," says Jones. By keeping the original floors and using inexpensive plywood in a standard maple finish for the cabinetry and ceiling, the designers accomplished a striking design with a minimum of resources.

    Photo by: Bruce Damonte

    Courtesy of: All rights reserved.

  • 
  Seating is noticeably absent from the interior, a conscious move. "The goal with this location was to provide epicurean-level coffee at a rate and speed that could meet the Financial District's demands," says Jones. "We did consider a much more standard layout, shrinking the back of house area and providing seating inside the cafe. We decided against it for several reasons, but mainly because we needed to accommodate more baristas to keep up with the pace of the area."  Photo by: Bruce DamonteCourtesy of: All rights reserved.
    Seating is noticeably absent from the interior, a conscious move. "The goal with this location was to provide epicurean-level coffee at a rate and speed that could meet the Financial District's demands," says Jones. "We did consider a much more standard layout, shrinking the back of house area and providing seating inside the cafe. We decided against it for several reasons, but mainly because we needed to accommodate more baristas to keep up with the pace of the area."

    Photo by: Bruce Damonte

    Courtesy of: All rights reserved.

  • 
  In the less-than-500-square-foot space, 75 percent of the cafe is dedicated to prep space for the baristas. Here's a look behind the counter. Keeping it as open as possible highlights the process and gives employees room to move around comfortably and efficiently.  Photo by: Bruce DamonteCourtesy of: All rights reserved.
    In the less-than-500-square-foot space, 75 percent of the cafe is dedicated to prep space for the baristas. Here's a look behind the counter. Keeping it as open as possible highlights the process and gives employees room to move around comfortably and efficiently.

    Photo by: Bruce Damonte

    Courtesy of: All rights reserved.

  • 
  "Conceptually, we've highlighted the interaction with the baristas as a theatrical experience," says Jones. "The idea was to keep counters low, and transparent so you can see things being made." The countertops are Caesarstone and the porcelain tile (painstakingly selected to match the shade of the original concrete flooring) was sourced from San Francisco's Global Tile Design. The shining star of the operation is a Strada espresso machine by La Marzocco, proudly displayed in the center of the bar.  Photo by: Bruce DamonteCourtesy of: All rights reserved.
    "Conceptually, we've highlighted the interaction with the baristas as a theatrical experience," says Jones. "The idea was to keep counters low, and transparent so you can see things being made." The countertops are Caesarstone and the porcelain tile (painstakingly selected to match the shade of the original concrete flooring) was sourced from San Francisco's Global Tile Design. The shining star of the operation is a Strada espresso machine by La Marzocco, proudly displayed in the center of the bar.

    Photo by: Bruce Damonte

    Courtesy of: All rights reserved.

  • 
  Here's another view of the interior. "It's intended to catch the eye of passersby even from across the street," says Jones.  Photo by: Bruce DamonteCourtesy of: All rights reserved.
    Here's another view of the interior. "It's intended to catch the eye of passersby even from across the street," says Jones.

    Photo by: Bruce Damonte

    Courtesy of: All rights reserved.

  • 
  The menu was custom-designed and inspired by retro train station signage.  Photo by: Bruce DamonteCourtesy of: All rights reserved.
    The menu was custom-designed and inspired by retro train station signage.

    Photo by: Bruce Damonte

    Courtesy of: All rights reserved.

  • 
  Horizontal lights are interspersed throughout the folded geometric plane of the ceiling.  Photo by: Bruce DamonteCourtesy of: All rights reserved.
    Horizontal lights are interspersed throughout the folded geometric plane of the ceiling.

    Photo by: Bruce Damonte

    Courtesy of: All rights reserved.

  • 
  The teak-and-stainless-steel outdoor furniture is the Stratus collection from Thatcher and Shannon Davis at Selamat Designs.Coffee Bar is open Monday through Friday, 6:00 AM to 5:00 PM. and is located at 101 Montgomery street in San Francisco.Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!   Photo by: Bruce DamonteCourtesy of: All rights reserved.
    The teak-and-stainless-steel outdoor furniture is the Stratus collection from Thatcher and Shannon Davis at Selamat Designs.Coffee Bar is open Monday through Friday, 6:00 AM to 5:00 PM. and is located at 101 Montgomery street in San Francisco.

    Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

    Photo by: Bruce Damonte

    Courtesy of: All rights reserved.

@current / @total

Categories:

More

Add comment

Log in or register to post comments
Advertising