Latest Articles in Urban Planning

QueensWay Plaza competition

AIANY Releases Winning Designs for Queens Greenway Project

The New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects has announced the winners of a design competition for a vertical gateway to a 3.5-mile stretch of abandoned railway in central Queens. The ultimate goal for the QueensWay, as it is called, is to transform this stretch of Rockaway Rail Line tracks into an elevated pedestrian and bicycle greenway connecting the neighborhoods of Rego Park, Richmond Hill, and Ozone Park. The effort is being led by the Trust for Public Land in cooperation with the Friends of the QueensWay and the City of New York. Click through the slideshow to view the winning designs, which will be the subject of an exhibition opening at the Center for Architecture in Manhattan on July 17, 2014.
February 12, 2014

The New Underground: Subway Stations Reimagined

In a campaign pledge last week that resembles a high school candidate’s promise to give out free pop during lunchtime, Paris mayoral candidate Nathalie Kosciusko-Morizet, of the center-right UMP party, floated the idea of reworking the abandoned “ghost stations” on the Paris metro. Photos released by her campaign, created by architects Manal Rachdi and Nicolas Laisné, show unused stops reimagined as public hotspots boasting amenities such as a swimming pool, theatre and concert hall, nightclub, art gallery and restaurant. While the move hasn’t made waves with the voting public, we love the idea. Here’s a selection of other plans, proposals and projects that reconceptualize what can be done underground.
February 11, 2014
nameless architecture byeollae south korea rw concrete church courtesy nameless architecture

NYAIA Recognizes 6 Creative New York Architecture and Design Studios

The New York chapter of the American Institute of Architects has announced the six winners of its biennial New Practices New York competition, which singles out promising and pioneering city-based architecture and design firms founded within the last decade. The jurors selected the winners from among 64 entries.
February 4, 2014
A modern park pavilion in Dallas, Snohetta, Architexas

A Modern Park Pavilion Rises in Dallas

In a modest park on the western edge of Dallas, a modern picnic pavilion is a gathering point.
December 10, 2013
chandigarh palace of assembly

6 Famous Brutalist Buildings

Named after its raw aesthetic, Brutalism in modern architecture features elements of strict linear design and repetitive geometric shapes. The controversial style rose to popularity in the 1950s and mostly fell out of favor in the last few decades with the exception of sporadic resurgences in South America and the Middle East. Here are six famous Brutalist buildings featured in Dwell.
December 7, 2013
city modern paola portrait

What Design Can Do For New York City: A City Modern Preview

After Hurricane Sandy brought New York City’s precarious coastline to the forefront of the city’s collective attention last year, heads turned toward the design community and their proposed solutions to lessen and prevent the disastrous effects of another super storm. Next week Paola Antonelli, senior curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art, will lead a group of her peers in a discussion how the design community can help with this issue and others to advance urban living. Joined by Pentagram's Michael Beirut, architect Deborah Berke and architecture critic Justin Davidson, the group will be moderated by New York design editor Wendy Goodman.
September 26, 2013

Friday Finds 09.13.13

From a tranquil tree museum to embroidered paintings to a medium format digital back for your iPhone, hop on in to see what our editors found this time around. Happy 13th!
September 13, 2013
dwell monstrum sdr boulevard1

Imaginative Playgrounds by Monstrum

Designers often talk about the importance of play, emphasizing its power to create creative breakthroughs. Design firm Monstrum, based in Denmark, took that idea one step further and decided to devote their entire practice toward building fun, innovative, well-designed playgrounds.
September 9, 2013
signage for new york city WalkNYC program by Pentagram

How New York City Developed its Wayfinding Signage

Our City Living issue, due out on newsstands September 10, focuses on design and architecture in urban locales. Here we turn our eye to the challenges of navigating a city and how graphic design can improve the experience, especially when it comes to walkability. As more cities seek to encourage multi-modal transportation—walking, biking, public transit, etc.—the need for good signage to make those activities easier becomes more and more apparent. At its simplest, wayfinding is defined as spatial problem solving—knowing where you are, where you want to go, and the best route to get there. Cartography, or mapmaking, has existed for thousands of years, tracing its roots to cave paintings, but the demands of modern cities and diverse populations call for more than a sign emblazoned with compass rose and a few street names. Today, effective urban maps require layers of information relayed in a clear, consistent, and concise manner so that anyone can quickly assess how to get from point A to point B. The New York Department of Transportation launched its WalkNYC program in the summer of 2013 to "provide a clear visual language and graphic standards that can be universally understood, encourage walking and transit usage by offering quality multi-modal information, and provide consistent information across a broad range of environments in the city." Lauded design firm Pentagram's PentaCityGroup developed the identity. We sent a few queries to Michael Bierut, a graphic designer and partner at the firm, to lean more about the program, what it means for the city's identity, and how technology does and doesn't factor into the program. "I feel strongly that one of the best things about the signs are that you don't need a smart phone to access them: they're right there on the street, as democratic as can be," he says. Read on for more.
August 29, 2013