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Pendelton ParkBlanket Glacier

Pendleton's Park Blankets

National parks blankets made in Oregon by Pendleton Woolen Mills. Taken as a group, all the Pendleton products have a rather rustic effect, but individually we could see them fitting well into a modernist interior. And besides, why not wrap yourself up in a toasty national park when the weather gets cold? Best of all, they're made here in the USA. Check the slideshow of images and weigh in with your favorite.
May 3, 2011
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Peru Gift Show 2011

Greetings from Peru! I'm in Lima reporting from the showroom floors of the National Gift Show and Peru Moda, a fashion tradeshow, taking place April 27th to 30th. An estimated 5,000 people come to the Gift Show, now in its 13th year, to spy the handcrafted wares from the Andean highlands to the coastal cities and everywhere in between. The designs at the Gift Show were 100% Peruvian made down to the cotton fibers in the textiles, the alpaca wool woven into rugs, the woods carved into ornaments and trinkets, and the natural dyes that saturate everything with bright hues. In this slideshow, have a look at some of the objects that caught my eye. Most were traditional handicrafts—quite wonderful and a real treat to see—though my favorites were the contemprary upcycled designs of Nuna Lab and Geldres Design.
April 30, 2011
nathan vincent

Nathan Vincent's Locker Room

Artist Nathan Vincent, will be showing his new work at the Bellevue Arts Museum through June 26th. Vincent's work utilizes crochet and yarn to recreate many masculine objects in a new softer form. He's knitted taxidermy busts, urinals, guns, and tools.  The exhibit at Bellevue, "The Mysterious Content of Softness" features 11 national and international artists including Nathan Vincent and Lauren DiCioccio, all working with fiber in various techniques: knitting, weaving, and crochet.  Nathan's piece "Locker Room" is exactly what fans of the artist's work would expect. He's recreated a locker room entirely of yarn. Urinals, lockers, showers, and benches trade wood and metal for yarn and foam.   Photos by Steven Miller.
April 29, 2011
Buildings seen from our Penthouse terrace framed pops of color perfectly.

Colors of Iceland

I just returned from a four-day trip to Reykjavik and am still filled with excitement. Though the sky was grey for most of my time in Iceland, the visit was anything but dark and gloomy. The colors found all around the country, from the landscape to the cityscape to the clothes people wore, spanned the full spectrum. Buildings stretched across the city's skyline were dotted in teal, brick red, and mustard. Shops were filled with traditional knitwear in elaborate patterns and avant-garde pieces (think Bjork) in bold primary colors. With every coffee shop I popped my head into and every corner I turned, I was treated with flash upon flash of color statements and mixes. The architecture, the sweaters, the bikes, and the cars were painted in pop washes that complimented the bright, cheery moods of the Icelanders I met during my stay—and provided ample ammo to fight away the solemn skies and hail showers that plagued our trip.
April 26, 2011

Q&A with Coyuchi's Design Director

Though my number-one dream job remains journalist and editor (lucky me!) a close second is textile and furniture designer (third place: documentary filmmaker). So I was excited about my recent email exchange with Laura Jo Wegman, who joined the Point Reyes linen brand Coyuchi as Design Director in 2009. At Coyuchi, Wegman designs and oversees the production of the entire product line including sheets, blankets, towels, robes, sleepwear and more. Since her arrival, she's totally transformed the brand, introducing new materials, textures, and color palettes, and drawing inspiration from her immediate environs: the fog, the shore, the trees, and the colors of west Marin.
April 14, 2011
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Friday Finds 4.01.11

In celebration of the first Friday in April, a trove of Dwell's favorite finds to usher you into the weekend.
April 1, 2011
boucherouite B5

Berber Ragtime

While on a trip to Marrakech late last year, Fort Street Studio owners Brad Davis and Janis Provisor came across a cache of boucherouite rugs made by Berber women most likely between the 1950s and 1970s. Essentially rag rugs made from scraps of whatever material was on hand (a resourceful reach beyond the expected wool), the pieces are colorful, highly personal relics of Berber village life, and would have been given as gifts or used as part of a dowry. “I was told that women would usually display their dowry rugs proudly if things were going well, or hide them away as a sign that she was not entirely happy in her marriage,” says Provisor. The painterly rugs, which range in size from 1 by 2 feet to 5 by 9 feet, are priced between $1,500 and $12,000 depending on size and design. Several were hung at Fort Street Studio’s Los Angeles showroom during the biannual West Week design gathering, and the bulk will be displayed at their New York showroom beginning April 28. “The weavers show an eccentric sense of composition in these rugs, and went beyond the typical Moroccan motifs,” says Provisor.
April 1, 2011
Made design

Made Design Shop and Gallery

Canada is known for its love of hockey and its long winters but few people know of our neighbor to the north's wealth of innovative modern designers. Enter Made. The Toronto shop and gallery features pieces that are—as the storefront suggests—"Canadian made, hand made, custom made, and well made." It's a celebration of what Canadian design is all about.
March 23, 2011
design shuffle 31

Mid-Century Textile Design

Among the vintage interior design trends, the mid-century modern designs of the 1950s are holding fast. TV shows like “Mad Men” seem to have struck a chord with many yearning for the days of simple style, cleaner lines and just a hint of frivolity. While many think of the 1950s as the “good ole days,” times were not as simple as the designs which would come out of this “atomic” era.
March 12, 2011
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