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Latest Articles in Textile Design

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Sympa3 MaterialChange competition

And the Material Change Winner Is...

Now that the experts have had their say, we are pleased to announce the grand prize winner of the Material Change Textile Competition. Without further ado, the design that will be put into production by Lulan Artisans is SYMPA 3, designed by Evan Polenghi! Our most heartfelt congratulations to Evan. Your stunning design won over the modern hearts of all! We wish you the very best with your Lulan debut. And, of course, a special thank you goes out to all who participated. Stay tuned to Dwell.com for more great contests in the future.
October 10, 2012
cloth and goods

Cloth and Goods

Specializing in products for the home, the textile-driven Portland, Oregon, webshop Cloth and Goods puts a spotlight on old-world fabrics and weaving techniques. Founder Melissa Newirth sources vintage and new materials from Japan, Africa, South Korea, and Lithuania, among other countries, and crafts them into soft goods that let the patterns, textures, and weaves of their respective textiles shine through. We sent a few queries to Newirth about her shop, which opened in the spring of 2012.
September 25, 2012
Material Change Textile Design Competition

Announcing the Material Change Finalists

We were blown away by the caliber of the 120 textile designs received in the Material Change design competition. Partnering with Lulan, we challenged readers to submit an original modern textile design idea using traditional weaving techniques and construction methods as inspiration. Below are the seven finalists. Check back in on October 9 to find out whose design will be put into production by Lulan.
September 14, 2012
tunisia montapis

Tendence 2012 at Messe Frankfurt: Textiles out of Africa

One of the special exhibitions at Tendence was Africa Chic, a collection of objects designed and manufactured in Africa. We rarely get a chance to feature designs from the continent, and so jumped at the chance to see what the show was about. Many of the objects were expected—woven baskets, traditional jewelry, wooden vases—but the textiles stood out. While traditional, the colors and geometric patterns would not look out of place in a modern home. A neighboring series of booths featuring designs from Tunisia—a country that is now finding its footing after overthrowing its former dictator—also featured some stunning pieces, which made for a rich haptic and visual experience. The grouping was meant more to boost exports and there isn't typically a click-to-buy online shop for the products (but many designers said that they take orders via email and phone). In the following slideshow, spy the bright colors, thick weaves, and unexpected materials on view at the fair.
August 27, 2012
Mismo explorer bag

Mismo Explorer Bag

Should you, weary traveler, be suffering from a crippling case of rollerboard fatigue, and have either the broad shoulders or iron will needed to port your carry-on entirely on your person, this is the weekender for you. I've long admired the clean lines, hardy canvas, and top-notch hardware of the Danish company Mismo's luggage. And this season brings with it the handsome Explorer, a leather-strapped bit of portage that puts that gym bag you've been lugging as a weekender to shame.
August 24, 2012
Experimental Dutch designer Christien Meindertsma

Christien Meindertsma: Act Local

Since graduating from Design Academy Eindhoven in 2003, Rotterdam-based Christine Meinderstma has carved a niche for herself exploring the stories of ordinary objects. Take her book PIG (2007), which minutely documents the huge range of items manufactured using some part of a single pig, known as 05949. Her One Sheep series of sweaters are each made using the wool of a single, identifiable member of the only merino flock in the Netherlands. Her simple and elegant Flax Lamp for Thomas Eyck uses five meters of flax rope made in the traditional way in the Netherlands by craftsmen who are the last representatives of a once-flourishing industry in maritime products. In all these examples, Meindertsma explores the hidden history of products, revealing the raw materials, processes and producers normally so invisible in our globalized world. Her work has been exhibited at MoMA, the V&A, and the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum.
August 2, 2012
nani rugs thumb

Nani Marquina's 25th Anniversary

Spanish rug and textile designer Nani Marquina, whose idyllic Ibiza weekend house we featured in Dwell's July/August 2012 "Designers at Home" issue, recently marked her company's 25th anniversary. To celebrate, she and her staff carried more than 60 rugs out to Virreina Square in Barcelona's Gracia district to watch the public interact with them.
July 31, 2012
Felt-maker Paula Leen handling felt fabrics

Sneak Peek: 'A World Apart'

Our July/August 2012 issue, on newsstands now, turns the spotlight on designers' own homes across the globe. One of my favorite projects in the issue is Paula Leen and Kees Middendorp's home in the northern Dutch province of Friesland, which I visited last winter and profiled in the magazine in "A World Apart." Leen, a felt-maker, and Middendorp, the town of Akkrum's harbormaster, showed me around their marina-side home, which they'd lived in for 16 years as renters before getting the opportunity to buy and renovate it. The resulting space has an aesthetic that is strongly influenced by their surroundings—all gray and black and white, "the colors of Friesland," as Leen puts it. It's filled with Leen's handmade felt pieces, salvaged vintage furniture, and custom iron fixtures, including an 11-foot-long kitchen island and a staircase that connects the upstairs living space with the downstairs workshop. Check dwell.com Sunday to read the full story. In the meantime, here's a sneak peek and some choice quotes from Leen.
July 28, 2012
Modern textile designer Dorothy Cosonas, creative director of Knoll

Knoll's Dorothy Cosonas: Fashion-Forward Textile Design

Those pink interiors of the 1950s can be traced—not to a prescient interior designer—but the fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli, who introduced a war-weary world to a hue she dubbed "shocking pink" in 1947. Point is: fashion has had a profound influence on interiors, although the trickle down from the catwalk to the couch has been reduced from years to the instantaneousness of the virtual world.
July 23, 2012
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