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Latest Articles in Product Design

Library Kitchen by Philippe Starck

Philippe Starck's Library Kitchen

There is no shortage of incredible kitchen systems to ogle—and if you're lucky, incorporate into your home. Following our recent coverage of Viola Park's new kitchen islands and Snaidero's Code Natural kitchen, here we highlight an imm cologne 2011 Interior Innovation Award Winner: Philippe Starck's Library Kitchen for Warendorf.
February 18, 2011
stockholm asplund kay bojesen

Stockholm Design Week 2011

We've been covering the 2011 Stockholm Furniture Fair for the past week, delving into everything from the heavy hitters on the main show floor to the promising young designers debuting prototypes in the Greenhouse. But one can't forget how important it is to soak up what's happening at satellite events around the city, where the creative types gather in the evening to have a drink or four, toast both the powerhouses and the rising stars, and just blow off steam from a day of meetings. Here we present a few images from the week.
February 13, 2011
stockholm lr light bar

Stockholm Furniture Fair 2011: Part II

After examining the wares of the younguns over at the Greenhouse, it was time to venture into the main portion of the Stockholm Furniture Fair. As is the case with any major design show, there were rows and rows of beautiful items, scores of exhibitors busily tending to last-minute booth preperations, and a constantly growing number of people shuffling around, mouths agape. Here we present a few images captured during eight straight hours on the floor—you'll see some just-released items, some old Scandinavian favorites, and lots and lots of this country's favorite color—yellow.
February 10, 2011
stockholm green house

Stockholm Furniture Fair 2011: Part I

This week marks the return of the Stockholm Furniture Fair, the largest annual design event in the Nordic part of the world. Celebrating its sixtieth year in existence, the fair is hosting nearly 800 exhibitors from 30 different countries. We're kicking off our coverage of the show by featuring new works found at the Greenhouse, the portion of the fair dedicated to independent designers and students. Much like Salone Satellite in MIlan, the Greenhouse is comprised of young designers' prototypes; a juried panel makes a final selection from the many submissions that fly in from design schools both near and far. Many of today's prominent designers were discovered here, including Nendo, Front, and Folkform, and this year's jury included Anna von Schewen, Matti Klenell, David Carlsson, and Louise Campbell. Here we present a small selection of pieces on display.    
February 9, 2011
Kaufmann Glasses

Kaufmann's Unbreakable Glasses

I was recently down in Los Angeles to moderate a panel on the Swiss Design Awards at the A+D Museum. There I met a 2009 award winner for product design, Sandra Kaufmann, who heads the eyewear brand Strada del Sole. Her durable, flexible sunglasses were one of the objects on display for this leg of the Swiss Design Award's world tour and in the video below she tells me precisely how they work. Thanks to Moni Fink for the expert camerawork.
February 8, 2011
Object #3, another early prototype that, while not exactly functional, informed the design of later pieces.

From Sweden: Note Design Studio

Stockholm-based Note Design Studio is like a Swedish Pee Wee's Playhouse--everything is cartoonish, playful, and very very fun. Founded in 2008, the group is comprised of a quirky mix of designers, architects and all-around creative types, and they combine their efforts to create products, interior spaces, branding for companies, and all manner of things. Their latest collection, Marginal Notes 2011, has just debuted at Stockholm Design Week, and was born from the scribbles that dotted the margins of the team's notebooks. As they tell it, one day during a strategy meeting they decided to take a break by looking at each other's doodles. From those initial sketches, odd proportions and odd configurations included, they launched a series of prototypes. In the end it became an exhibition of weird and wonderful objects. Take a look at the pieces, and the studio's charming liner notes.
February 7, 2011
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Anna von Schewen

While in Vegas for Surfaces and Las Vegas Market, I had the chance to not only take in the terrific 17 Swedish Designers exhibit but also chat with Anna von Schewen and hear her lecture. She spoke about Swedish history (lamenting a lack of a design award among the Nobel prizes and reminding everyone that Pippi Longstocking was a Swedish character), Scandianvian design ("We have a philosophy of openness, simplicity, and modernity," she said, adding that "recently the focus has been less about functionality and more about emotionality"), and Swedish product innovations (like the BabyBjörn and the Peepoo single-use, biodegradable toilet bag). Here, she takes us on a tour of her own designs.
February 7, 2011
Canada's <a href="http://cherrywoodstudio.ca/">Cherrywood Studio</a>, who designed this table, uses locally-sourced large urban hardwood trees that would otherwise be destined for landfill sites.

IDS Toronto 2011

The thirteenth annual Interior Design Show (IDS) of Toronto—one of Canada's largest contemporary design shows—took place January 27th-30th. Over 300 exhibitors gathered at the Metro Toronto Convention Center to show their wares—ranging from furniture to lighting to textiles—to an estimated 50,000 people. Though IDS has been around for more than a decade, this year exceeded many expectations. "People are really pulling out all the stops here," says Yuill McGregor of North on Sixty, a Toronto-based woodworking studio that participated in the show. And judging from the wealth of designs from both emerging and established exhibitors, McGregor was right on in his assessment. In the following slideshow, have a look at few highlights from the sprawling array of designs on view at this year's IDS.
February 5, 2011
edward fields

Edward Fields Iconics

Edward Fields—an American carpet maker whose rugs dress the floors in the Glass House, Hollyhock House, and Lever House—recently released "Iconics," a collection of eleven designs inspired by their most distinct patterns unveiled throughout their 70 year history. Ranging from retro designs of the 1950's and 1960's to more contemporary patterns from the 1980's and 1990's, these "reissued" rugs represent what Edward Fields has long been known for: distinct, bold patterns and an experimental sensibility. While the patterns remain largely untouched from their originals, their current iterations have been adapted for today's tastes (think shorter pile height, new materials and a modern color palette). Click through the slideshow to see the designs along with a few mid-century photographs of the carpets in-situ.
February 4, 2011
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