Latest Articles in Lighting Design

marcus buck KK FF

Friday Finds 05.04.12

Editor Real Talk, a Ryan Gosling–like meme featuring econospeak, a young design company out of New Zealand, and more in this installment of Friday Finds. 
May 4, 2012
Counterbalance light by Daniel Rybakken

Daniel Rybakken

Norwegian designer Daniel Rybakken explores how light affects people’s moods. WE LOVE: His experiments with simulated daylight and the six-and-a-half-foot-long Counterbalance light.
April 24, 2012
Greta Lampshade by WHATSWHAT Collective

WHATSWHAT Collective

The Swedish WHATSWHAT Collective, founded by John Astbury, Bengt Brummer, and Karin Wallenbeck in 2010, creates playful pieces that invite user interaction. WE LOVE: The Greta lampshade, with a drawstring that directs light up or down. 
April 24, 2012
Shelf Lamp by Andreas Engesvik

Andreas Engesvik

Andreas Engesvik, cofounder of NORWAY SAYS, established a solo studio in Oslo in 2009, creating offbeat updates of ordinary pieces. WE LOVE: The Shelf lamp, meant to nestle amid books like a sculpture.
April 24, 2012
T12 light by Sarah Pease

Sarah Pease

Sarah Pease (Rhode Island School of Design), T12 Light, 2011: The T12 light is a shining example of simple, premade materials deployed in an elegant fashion. The black walnut and aluminum base supports an industrial, U-shaped fluorescent lightbulb, set off by a braided fabric cord.
April 24, 2012
Ceramic and cork canisters by Dokter and Misses

Dokter and Misses

“I love Johannesburg-based Dokter and Misses’ ceramic and cork canisters and clever light-and-shelf combo.”
April 24, 2012
Federico Churba portrait by Bernd Schifferdecker

Federico Churba

Federico Churba graduated from the industrial design program at the University of Buenos Aires in 2001, right on the cusp of Argentina’s economic crisis and the collapse of its peso. His country’s reduced reliance on imports and shift to domestic industry meant a short testing period for young designers. “There was a strong pull to start producing immediately and showing the world what we could do,” says Churba. From the beginning, he was interested in manipulating material and forms to create simple, newly iconic shapes. An early influence was Vico Magistretti and his 1986 Vidun table, whose height-adjustable base is an outsized wooden screw.
April 23, 2012
burning wax candle


Lisa Heschong, a California architect with the Heschong Mahone Group, which specializes in research on building performance, doesn’t think much of firelight: “The use of fire for lighting, while romantic, is extraordinarily inefficient, energy intensive, and potentially polluting. Indoor combustion is one of the main sources of indoor air pollution, especially in the third world.” Cities like Sacramento, California, even limit wood-burning fireplaces to keep skies clearer. “In our climate,” Heschong explains, ”the presence of smoke in the winter increases the prevalence of soot, thereby reducing daylight.”
April 11, 2012
use of fire and energy in the home

Fire in the Home 101

Taming fire was humankind’s first and most critical step toward its mastery of the material world. About 400,000 years ago, our ancestors learned to harness the flame, setting us on the course that would lead from the stone hearths those early humans built to the modern high-efficiency catalytic woodstoves we use today. More important, though, was the capacity to selectively apply heat, a transformative power that allows us to turn dirt into metal, cold into warmth, dark into light.
April 11, 2012