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Pulled by Mike Perry

Pulled by Mike Perry

Illustrator Mike Perry has long been a favorite at Dwell (just take a glance at his long list of contributions to the magazine). In his new book, Pulled: A Catalog of Screen Printing, Perry opens the page to other screen artists in this survey of more than 40 contemporary screen printers. Here, we take a peek inside 256-page coffee table topper, out next month.
April 26, 2011
mike horn pangaea

Friday Finds 4.22.11

We have the great perk at Dwell to spend our days entrenched in the world of design. In this installment of Friday Finds, have a look at a handful of the things that caught our attention over the last few days: reissued movie posters from the 1980s, lo-fi design, cheerful penguins, and "Survivorman meets Jacques Cousteau." Plus, a special hello to our neighbors in the building across the street, who were an officewide favorite this week.
April 22, 2011
sustainism thumb

"Sustainism": the New Modernism?

Honestly, when the book Sustainism is the New Modernism: A Cultural Manifesto for the Sustainist Era (D.A.P. / Distributed Art Publishers, New York) first crossed my desk, I wasn't sure how to react. The book's graphic aesthetic was a bit cluttered but the concept of the book was intriguing—the authors Michiel Schwarz and Joost Elffers propose that "Sustainism" (a term they've coined to describe a new cultural movement related to sustainability)—is the "new ecology of our networked world." "Sustainism in the twenty-first century will be what Modernism was in the last," the authors state. It's "the confluence of globalization, the web, climate change, localism, media democracy, open source, environmentalism, and more," and "a collective worldview that stresses the interdependence among cultural and natural environments." The rallying cry is "do more with less"—in contrast to Modernism's ubiquitous "less is more." Here, Schwarz and Elffers talk about Sustainism (the book, and the concept) and why they think it's the way forward.
April 4, 2011
Evergreen Brick Works

Evergreen Brick Works

Toronto's skyline is speckled with bricks from the former Don Valley Brick Works yard. In the 1960s and 70s, the company produced more than 43 million bricks each year. But after business slowed in the 1980s, the yard was forced to shutter its doors and the thus no-longer-maintained, 12-acre site fell into disrepair. Today, however, it's back up and running—though with a new directive—with the help of Canadian nonprofit Evergreen. Renamed Evergreen Brick Works, the site is designed to be a community, environmental space where sustainable businesses can establish themselves and grow; artists can work; and locals can come to explore the site, take a walk, ice skate, buy local produce at the farmers' market, and meander around the 16 buildings being rehabilitated. Here we take you along on our recent walk through the site.  
April 4, 2011
Graphic Design on the Radio Shaughnessy

Graphic Design on the Radio

You may already be a fan of TV on the Radio, but how about Graphic Design on the Radio? Despite having a score of episodes under his belt and being a well known graphic designer and critic, Englishman Adrian Shaughnessy's fine radio show flies a bit under the radar. For we Yanks, we're best off listening online at Graphic Design on the Radio.
March 30, 2011
Hero Business of Design

Hero Design On Making It

Mark Brickey and Beth Manos Brickey started their design careers like many youthful print enthusiasts: making free concert fliers from friends. Since then, however, they've launched a design studio, opened a retail shop to bring people into their brand (think: the Apple store experience at a much smaller scale), and become so busy with design work that they're closing the doors on their store in early April to devote all their time to what they love: making good designs. Here, Mark shares his tale of dropping out of school, having his a-ha moment at SXSW, launching the design studio with Beth, and never looking back.
March 28, 2011
dahlgren

Maria Dahlgren on Design

In her graphic wooden serving trays, Swedish designer Maria Dahlgren deftly takes on the "tacky souvenirs" of the world. Her delightfully bold, retro-inspired designs feature the names of some of the most-favorite tourist destinations—like London, Stockholm, and Helsinki—alongside "cityscapes" comprised of things that each place is known for (like Big Ben, Christopher Wren's St. Paul's Cathedral, the Tower Bridge, and umbrellas for London). Maria chatted about about the cities she loves, the designers who inspire her, and Sweden's foremost national treasure: ABBA. Here's what she has to say.
March 17, 2011
Poketo wallets

Poketo Artist Wallets

Los Angeles-based design company Poketo's claim to fame is its artists wallets (though its also offers some sweet Spacetime wall decals, adorable Smile cards, and fun Mood bottle openers). Featuring the work of top-notch artists from around the world, the wallets are each intended to be "a traveling art show" and make art and design available to the masses (the money holders ring in at just $20 a piece). Poketo just announced its new spring 2011 designs so we've rounded up a few of our favorites, new and old.
March 9, 2011
Salone Internazionale del Mobile 1961 Camillo Pizzigoni poster

Salone Posters

In the beginning, there was Italy. When a handful of furniture manufacturers formed Cosmit in 1961, Salone Internazionale del Mobile was conceived to promote homegrown talent. In the subsequent half-century, the Milano fair went über-international and has since become the biggest design spectacle of the year. Here, we take a look back at how the graphic identity of the event has evolved. Buon compleanno, Salone!
March 7, 2011
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