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Abe's Penny Live at Artseen in Miami

The worlds of visual arts and creative writing intersect this month in Miami at "Abe's Penny Live," an event hosted by Brooklyn publishing house, Abe's Penny in conjunction with "O, Miami," the city's poetry festival, sponsored by the Knight Foundation, and sculpture students from the New World School of the Arts. The collaborative exhibition, which opened April 1st and will close on April 26th, features photography by Lee Materazzi, Francie Bishop Good, Samantha Salzinger and Robby Campbell. Viewers are invited to write poems inspired by the photography in any one of the sculptural installation "writing environments" created by NWSA students. Anna Knoebel, Abe's Penny's editor, fills us in on the happenings at Artseen Gallery in Miami.  
April 18, 2011
modern pet

Pousse Creative's Pet Houses

Designers Sebastian Haquet and Thomas Lanthier have a decidedly modern take on shelters for pets. Their Lille-based company, Pousse Creative, was founded in 2010 with a chicken run designed for suburban environments and quickly grew to encompass a complete line of modern dwellings for rabbits, cats, dogs, and birds. These modern, eco-friendly abodes are weatherproof and rugged enough for outdoors, but stylish enough for your living room. Plus they do double duty in providing a cozy napping spot that's a very short jaunt for your furry friend to nibble on some herbs. What better way is there to merge nature, animals, and functionality into our urban lifestyles?
April 14, 2011
milan 2011 satellite sign

Salone Satellite 2011

One of the most exciting perks of being lucky enough to attend Italy's Salone Internazionale del Mobile, also known as the Milan Furniture Fair, is having the opportunity to get a glimpse of undiscovered talent at Salone Satellite. Located at nearly the end of the sprawing Feriamilano exhibition complex, Salone Satellite is an area devoted to students, independent designers, and enterprising producers of design-forward prototypes in need of a manufacturer and a distributor. All year long, a carefully selected jury of design cognoscenti reviews submissions from all over the world, and grants access to a final tally of young hopefuls looking to make their introduction into the realm of high design. Check out our slideshow to see a few items that caught our eye today.
April 13, 2011
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The Century of Modern Design

Of the myriad books on modernism—some more enlightening than others—The Century of Modern Design (Flammarion) will likely prove to be an important one. Culled from the Liliane and David M. Stewart collection (now part of the permanent collection at the Montreal Museum of Modern Art), the highlighted pieces are chronicled by decade, from 1930 through 2009. Designers range from the most revered to the little-known; some, where appropriate to the ongoing story and depending on their prolificness, appear more than once (the Eameses, Gaetano Pesce, Verner Panton). Edited by David A. Hanks, the book unfolds as a careful study of what we have come to call modern, exemplified here as a series of artful movements that are at times so innovative, they almost defy categorization.  
April 13, 2011
milan 2011 cassina ice corbu

Milan 2011: Day One

Dwell has traveled to Milan, Italy, for the 2011 Salone Internazionale del Mobile, the largest furniture fair in the world, to see firsthand the latest novelties from renowned designers and to discover the new creations from yet-to-be-discovered talent. Before we even set foot on the FeriaMilano grounds, we first head to the satellite events around the city to get a taste of what's to come this week. Here we share some images from our first day, and if this slideshow piques your interest, be sure to follow us on Twitter to get up-to-the-minute updates all week, straight from the show floor of Salone.
April 11, 2011
Milan 2011 sneak peek

Sneak Peek: Milan Furniture Fair '11

Next week, the Salone Internazionale del Mobile (also known as the Milan Furniture Fair) kicks off it in Italy's design capital, Milan. Celebrating its 50th year, the fair promises to best itself again and boasts a star-studded lineup of the who's who of the design world. We're sending our editors abroad this weekend to report on the action, and in the meantime, we offer a sneak peek at what will be debuting at the show.
April 8, 2011
Second Chances exhibit at SFO

Second Chances at SFO

One of the nicest parts of traveling through the San Francisco International Airport is its art gallery in Terminal 3. As I made my way to Las Vegas this week for Surfaces and Las Vegas Market (check back soon for slideshows highlighting the best from both), I took a stroll through the latest installation titled Second Chances: Folk Art Made from Recycled Remnants.
April 7, 2011
high point 2011 domitalia robots1

High Point Market 2011

April 2nd to the 7th marked the spring High Point Market, a tradeshow that takes place in the heart of American furniture country. One of the oldest furniture fairs in the United States, the Market traces its roots back to 1909 when it was called the "Southern Furniture Expo." Twice a year in April and October, an estimated 80,000 people convene to get the scoop on some of the newest and soon-to-be-released interior design wares. The Market slants to the traditional and "transitional," but the contemporary held its ground (though it took some sifting for me to find). In the following slideshow, have a look at what was brought to Market by a handful of the 2,000+ exhibitors, make a pit stop at the world's largest chest of drawers, and take in the color du jour (hint: it was NOT Pantone's Honeysuckle).
April 7, 2011
Monica Forster in her Stockholk studio

Swedish Designer Focus: Monica Förster

Monica Förster takes a hands-on approach to furniture design. In her Stockholm studio, she whips up a flurry of tiny paper models—”3-D sketches”—that rival their full-scale progeny for beauty and craftsmanship. “The computer is a tool; I can’t do without it. But the nice thing about making models is that in the process of doing, I’m more open to mistakes—maybe I put the tape in a way that I don’t intend, but it shows a new possibility. In a computer everything is perfect. When I make models, it’s intuitive and rough: I take a flat piece of paper, I cut it, I tape it. It’s very quick. I find it very refreshing,” says Förster.
April 6, 2011
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