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Second Chances exhibit at SFO

Second Chances at SFO

One of the nicest parts of traveling through the San Francisco International Airport is its art gallery in Terminal 3. As I made my way to Las Vegas this week for Surfaces and Las Vegas Market (check back soon for slideshows highlighting the best from both), I took a stroll through the latest installation titled Second Chances: Folk Art Made from Recycled Remnants.
April 7, 2011
Maru's Wasara collection features an array of beautifully designed biodegradable picnic plates, bowls, and cups.

The Next-Generation Paper Plate

I'm currently planning a party (ok, wedding) and have been coming across lots of interesting paper party supplies—including these awesome Gunilla Axén-designed cocktail napkins, which I am unreasonably thinking about shipping from England, and these ubiquitous but very charming paper straws, which I am most definitely ordering. Although we'll likely be serving dinner on proper china, I am tempted by these beautiful paper plates, bowls, and cups by Wasara: the loveliest disposable tableware I've seen.
April 7, 2011
Yellow North Face tent atop a wooden deck

A Platform for Living

Setsumasa and Mami Kobayashi’s weekend retreat, two and a half hours northwest of Tokyo, is “an arresting concept,” photographer Dean Kaufman says, who documented the singular refuge in the Chichibu mountain range. “It’s finely balanced between rustic camping and feeling like the Farnsworth House.”
April 6, 2011
sustainism thumb

"Sustainism": the New Modernism?

Honestly, when the book Sustainism is the New Modernism: A Cultural Manifesto for the Sustainist Era (D.A.P. / Distributed Art Publishers, New York) first crossed my desk, I wasn't sure how to react. The book's graphic aesthetic was a bit cluttered but the concept of the book was intriguing—the authors Michiel Schwarz and Joost Elffers propose that "Sustainism" (a term they've coined to describe a new cultural movement related to sustainability)—is the "new ecology of our networked world." "Sustainism in the twenty-first century will be what Modernism was in the last," the authors state. It's "the confluence of globalization, the web, climate change, localism, media democracy, open source, environmentalism, and more," and "a collective worldview that stresses the interdependence among cultural and natural environments." The rallying cry is "do more with less"—in contrast to Modernism's ubiquitous "less is more." Here, Schwarz and Elffers talk about Sustainism (the book, and the concept) and why they think it's the way forward.
April 4, 2011
Seedlings illustration by Malin Rosenqvist

Seedlings

Before gathering those rosebuds, before planting the roses themselves, learn about what’s in store for your garden.
March 15, 2011
Seedlings illustration by Malin Rosenqvist

Modern Sharecropping

For every well-tended backyard garden there’s another gone to seed, and for every happy horticulturalist noodling with the begonias out front there’s a cooped-up apartment dweller anxious to work outdoors. A movement is afoot, however, to unite landless gardeners with available plots of land, and it promises to both make better use of urban space and bring people together over a basket of shared vegetables or flowers.
March 15, 2011
Pests illustration by Malin Rosenqvist

Pest Practices

For decades home gardeners have turned to an arsenal of chemical pesticides, herbicides, and synthetic fertilizers to keep their lawns, ornamentals, and veggies looking perfect. Unfortunately, this type of garden control has a dangerous impact on the ecosystem.
March 15, 2011
Potting illustration by Malin Rosenqvist

Going to Pot

Container gardening is often the only option for apartment dwellers longing for some greenery in their lives and soil under their fingernails. If you have limited space, grow something that you can really get a kick out of—like mint for mojitos—but bear in mind that when growing in containers, sunlight, drainage, and soil nutrients are your primary concerns.
March 15, 2011
Completed in 2010, the 656,600-square-foot Eight House comprises over 107,000 square feet of office and retail space at ground level and 476 units throughout the nine floors above. Inside the two courtyards are over 5,300 square feet of public space for t

Bjarke Ingels on 'Bigamy'

It might be an understatement to say that Bjarke Ingels' firm the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has gone gangbusters. In a climate where much new construction is being delayed indefinitely and architecture firms are shrinking in size, BIG was recently awarded three high-profile contracts: The Greenland National Gallery of Art, Copenhagen's future 700-million-dollar waste to energy plant, and their first project in North America, a 600-unit residential building on West 57th Street in Manhattan. We caught up with Ingels right before he gave the keynote speech at the Global Green Cities Symposium last Thursday. He briefed us on his recent projects, how New York is becoming more and more like Copenhagen, and why "Bigamy" could be the next great concept in design.
March 1, 2011
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