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Hidden series bags by Timbuk2

Timbuk2 Hidden Series

The problem with reusable bags is actually reusing them. At my apartment, there is reusable bag upon reusable bag (mostly the kind you can buy at the grocery store that resemble a paper bag) but for the majority of the time, they sit there unused. About a year ago, however, I received a Hidden Tote by Timbuk2 and finally found a fabric bag I would reliably carry aorund and toss my groceries in.
June 29, 2010
Kohler Dwell on Design preview

Preview: Shane Judd of Kohler

Water efficiency is as important as ever and this weekend we take the stage not once but twice to discuss ways to be more water wise. Joining Dwell editor Miyoko Ohtake and Dwell digital content director Amanda Dameron at 2010 Dwell on Design in Los Angeles Saturday, June 26 and Sunday, June 27 will be Shane Judd from Kohler, Leigh Jerrard from California Greywater Corps, and Jeremy Levine from Jeremy Levine Design. We teased out some easy water-saving solutions from Judd and share them in the Q&A below. We'll have more advice this weekend so join us at the L.A. Convention Center Friday through Sunday.
June 22, 2010
Leigh Jerrard

Preview: Greywater Corps

Dwell on Design is quickly approaching and here at the office we're finalizing the finishing touches and getting ready for our road trip down to Los Angeles (which will surely include the requisite lunch stop at In-N-Out along the 5). In the meantime, we bring you a preview of our water conservation panels taking place on the Sustainability Stage on Saturday, June 26 and Sunday, June 27.
June 15, 2010
Food Map Container 1

Preview: Jon Wilson, Food Map Design

The urban-rural gap is quickly shrinking and interest in local, organic food is continuously increasing. And today, it's not unusually to find gardeners harvesting their own produce even in a concrete-filled, car-centric city like Los Angeles. Food Map Design's Jon Wilson tells us the ins and outs of urban gardening, offering tips for even those with the brownest of thumbs for container gardening.
June 12, 2010
begley house

Preview: Ed Begley, Jr.

Ed Begley, Jr. is wearing what can most accurately be described as his uniform, a blue dress shirt unbuttoned to reveal a white t-shirt, khaki cargo shorts and Crocs with socks. Not your typical Emmy Award-nominated actor outfit, but neither is his current behavior. He is standing on the sidewalk outside his house, showing recent improvements he made to his parkway, that tiny strip of city-owned land between sidewalk and street. Begley, who lives on a corner lot, removed the resource-sucking swatches of grass and laced new gravel-edged, native plots with efficient drip-irrigation. When he moved into this home in 1988, he says, it was the same story. He tore out the lawn and added  drought-tolerant plants like rosemary, a fragrant sprig of which he rolls between  his fingers as he identifies the trees in his orchard of apples, figs and loquats. "The apples are not quite ready," he says, bounding to the far corner of the yard. "But the loquats are really good! Here, help yourself to a few." Begley will be sharing this same zest for sustainable living with the audience at this year's Dwell on Design.
June 11, 2010
Project H's latest initiative is a vending machine that gives you California poppies, not cavities.

Preview: Project H Design

"Change for change" innocently declares a bright green vending machine, but this design intervention delivers more bang for your buck than the typical candy dispenser. The latest initiative from the non-profit Project H Design is a series of vending machines that swap gumballs for greenery: Deposit two quarters and GreenAid delivers a Jawbreaker-sized seed bomb into the palm of your hand. Project H has placed about eight machines across L.A. (including one that lives on the Coolhaus ice cream sandwich truck), one at the 360SEE gallery in Chicago, and the newest, at the Bi-Rite Market in San Francisco. Gather up your loose change: They'll be displaying their concept, as well as other Project H work, at this year's Dwell on Design.
June 10, 2010
The Cleantech Corridor cuts a wide swath through L.A.'s downtown for four miles along the Los Angeles River.

Preview: Cleantech Corridor Competition

Imagine a massive green community running through the heart of Los Angeles where research labs and small businesses exist side-by-side with design-focused companies manufacturing everything from sustainable fashion to electric cars. Where parks take precedence over parking lots, and plentiful housing, shops and restaurants allow employees to live just a short bike ride away from work. That's the kind of future for Los Angeles's downtown that organizers hope will be envisioned by the new Cleantech Corridor competition, to be launched during the Green District panel at Dwell on Design.
June 7, 2010
Glass Jar Terrariums Workshop thumbnail

Glass Jar Terrariums

Terrariums have once again taken off--just like Indie Mart founder Kelly Malone's San Francisco craft space Workshop. Malone opened Workshop in September 2009 and has since been selling out classes on screen printing, sewing, cake decorating, mixology, and more. My colleague Jordan Kushins and I were bitten by the terrarium bug a few months ago, so we signed up for Malone's glass jar terrarium class with our colleague Dakota Keck and our friend Tara.   
April 2, 2010
New Orleans Botanical Garden Duplantier Volunteer Pavilion thumbnail

Botanical Garden Pavilion

When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005, architect and University of Kentucky lecturer Mike McKay felt the pull to go down to the Big Easy to help with a task that was anything but easy: rebuilding the devastated city. He moved to Louisiana for two years to lead the architecture school's Knoa Studio, a program that tasked studios to develop designs for neighborhoods, restaurants, and the city transit system. McKay moved back to Kentucky in 2007 but his work there was far from finished. During the storm, many of the old cypress trees in City Park and its New Orleans Botanical Garden were uprooted and the gardens were decimated. McKay's uncle, Paul Soniat, was the botanical gardens director at the time and called McKay. A local woman had donated money to build a structure for volunteers, who were the main source of maintenance for the park after the storm, and they needed a design. With very little money, very generous material donors, and a modular system that incorporated the supplies, McKay created the New Orleans Botanical Garden Duplantier Volunteer Pavilion.
March 23, 2010
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