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Latest Articles in Books

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A Collection A Day

From delightfully mismatched buttons to colorful spools of thread to vintage typewriter ribbon, a variety of small, unexpected collections can be found in charming little tins. Thanks to artist/illustrator Lisa Congdon’s A Collection A Day blog project, we can now find her brand spankin’ new book of the same title oh-so-appropriately packaged in a tactile and highly covetable collector’s tin too. Designed and published in collaboration with UPPERCASE’s Janine Vangool, the book is chock full of “voracious collector” Congdon’s nostalgic finds—organized into 365 artful collections. As Congdon’s personal creative challenge for 2010, she curated her inspired finds (vintage luggage tags, pink erasers from yesteryear, old matchbooks, and even dolls’ hands) into related compositions and posted them on her blog everyday for a year. In celebration of the book launch, Congdon’s collections and original artwork are on view now through April 17th at the Curiosity Shoppe in San Francisco. But for a peak inside the book and into the highly imaginative mind of its creator, check out the slideshow.
March 28, 2011
Print Workshop: Hand-Printing Techniques and Truly Original Projects by Christine Schmidt

Print Workshop

A blank canvas can really get the blood pumping. For some, the sight is a beacon. For others, it can be intimidating. Christine Schmidt, founder and creative force behind San Francisco–based studio Yellow Owl Workshop, falls firmly in the former category, but Print Workshop, her first book, is designed to appeal to anyone who’s interested in giving printing a try.
March 27, 2011
crafting a meaningful home

Crafting a Meaningful Home

Anonymous mass production is losing its mass-market appeal, and there’s a growing movement toward owning things that have origins beyond an assembly line. Handmade crafts have an inherent history, so it’s telling that the 27 projects outlined in Crafting a Meaningful Home are linked by two very strong, very personal themes: family and place.
March 24, 2011
atlantis exterior

Greece's Atlantis Books

In light of our Independent Bookstores Across America map, I've recently been inspired by the unique story of Atlantis Books, which is across the big pond in Santorini, Greece. The original idea for Atlantis came in 2002 after a handful of Americans traveled the Greek isles, finished their books and went in search of a decent bookstore. The beauty of the landscape inspired them, but there was no bookshop, so they drank some wine and decided to open one. The unique live/work space has become a cultural center for the community with poetry readings on the roof, a Tzatziki festival and book binding classes. I sat down with Chris Bloomfield, one of the co-founders, to get the scoop.
March 21, 2011
Photojournalist Finbarr O'Reilly documented anti-Qaddafi sentiments strewn across walls and on posters in Libya. Photo via <a href="http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/15/caricaturing-qaddafi/">The New York Times</a>.

Friday Finds 3.18.11

In this week's Friday Finds, we here at Dwell searched the depths of the web to bring you the tale of two cosmonauts, the Spanish tradition of "Castellers," a new take on bear skin rugs, and a real estate find many John Hughes fans will appreciate.
March 18, 2011
Immaterial World Cover Crop

Marc Kristal on Immaterial World

One of my favorite writers in Dwell is our contributing editor Marc Kristal. His latest story for us—the centerpiece of the issue, if you ask me—is a mad dash around New York City finding high design in all five boroughs. When he's not searching his coat pockets for his Metrocard, Kristal works penning books in addition to magazine stories. I had a chat with him about his latest, Immaterial World: Transparency in Architecture out later this month from Monacelli Press.
March 15, 2011
glass house thumb

A New View on the Glass House

We've all seen images of the Glass House, the iconic architectural landmark that Philip Johnson built in New Canaan, Connecticut in 1949. Breaking from the traditional view on the property, photographer James Welling spent three years photographing the Glass House, using digital cameras set on a tripod and holding a variety of filters in front of the lens to a chieve a colorful, almost psychedelic effect. As Welling described it in an interview with Artforum, the use of filters enabled his project to become "a laboratory for ideas about transparency, reflectivity and color." Here's a peek at some images from the new book, due out from Damiani on April 30th. All images courtesy of David Zwirner, New York.  
March 14, 2011
Professor Suleiman Osman of George Washington University in Washington, DC.

Brownstone Brooklyn

In our New York issue, on newsstands now, we take a look at all five boroughs of America's biggest, most vital city. One that ends up getting quite a bit of play in Dwell is increasingly-less-scrappy Brooklyn. A subject professor Suleiman Osman of George Washington University takes up in his new book The Invention of Brownstone Brooklyn: Gentrification and the Search for Authenticity in Postwar New York. Out this month from Oxford University Press, the book takes a look at the wave of "brownstoners" who moved into what was then known as "South Brooklyn" (you might now know it as Boerum Hill, Cobble Hill, Clinton HIll and other neighborhoods) in search of cheap real estate, a sense of neighborhoody history, and an antidote to suburban living. I chatted with Osman about the book, the future of Brooklyn, and the legacy of the brownstoners of the late 60s and early 70s.
March 1, 2011
This photo, taken from designtaxi.com, shows off three views of Paris's Librarie la Hune.

The Language of Bookshops

In the latest installment of Three Buildings, a semi-regular series where I ask people from all over the creative spectrum to muse on a trio of buildings or spaces that they love, I got in touch with Peter Sokolowski, editor-at-large for Merriam-Webster's dictionary. Who better to give us an idiosyncratic take on the world's best bookstores than a true guardian of all those precious words? Here's what Peter has to say:
February 23, 2011
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