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In 2006, <a href="http://makezine.com/"><i>Make</i></a> magazine hosted the first Maker Faire in San Mateo, California (located in between San Francisco and San Jose). Since then, it has launched annual "faires" in Detroit and New York City as well as "Mi

Maker Faire 2011

This weekend, Maker Faire—dubbed "the world's largest DIY festival"—took over the San Mateo County Event Center for its two-day do-it-yourself, show-and-tell extravaganza. There were hundreds of makers proudly parading their homemade and home-built wares to the estimated 80,000 people in attendance. Click through our slideshow for some of our favorite finds at the festival.
May 23, 2011
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Friday Finds 5.13.11

It's an exciting week for Dwell as our editors are off in New York City for Design Week. If you aren't able to make the trek to Gotham, have a gander at the designs in this week's Friday Finds. First off, a typographic poster of those golden two-letter words acceptable to use in Scrabble and "Sumo Lake," an animation drawn entirely by hand.
May 13, 2011
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New Olds at Israeli Design Museum

There's an interesting new museum in Israel, just south of Tel Aviv, with a corkscrewing exterior of rust-red Cor-Ten steel: Design Museum Holon, designed by Ron Arad. Their forthcoming exhibition is especially compelling. "New Olds: Design Between Tradition and Innovation" will run May 26 through September 10, curated by Volker Albus in collaboration with the Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen. The wide-ranging show spotlights works by over sixty Israeli and international designers who straddle tradition and innovation, drawing inspiration from historical references and symbols ranging from cuckoo clocks and deer antlers to traditional porcelain and Baroque objects. Maarten Baas, for example, has reinterpreted the mundane white plastic garden chair, melding it with a hand-carved wooden chair; Frank Willems bends and twists mattresses to form chairs and stools. If you happen to be in Israel over the next few months, check it out—especially if you can visit during one of the accompanying lectures, given by international designers and 18 up-and-coming and established Israeli designers. Here's a peek at what's on view, along with some commentary on each piece by Albus and Galit Gaon, the chief curator of the museum.
May 13, 2011
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Zaha Hadid's Milan Installation

As part of last month's Milan Design Week, Zaha Hadid Architects teamed with LEA Ceramiche to create "Twirl," a mesmerizing installation in the 18th-century courtyard of the State University in Milan. It was up for only a week and has since been disassembled, but since I just received some beautiful pictures of the piece I figured I'd share.
May 10, 2011
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Lesley Anton's Ceramic Muses

Citing inspirations ranging from the rocks of Joshua Tree to sand dunes, bamboo and her grandmother’s milk-glass hobnail bottles, Los Angeles-based ceramist Lesley Anton began her craft with clay classes at the 92nd Street Y in New York City. She worked out of her garage and backyard in Los Angeles for nine years before moving into a studio with a storefront in which she displays her functional work, consisting of bowls, mugs and utensil vessels. Anton is inspired by ceramists Beatrice Wood “for her creativity and flat out ballsiness,” Adam Silverman “for his peaceful, minimal profiles with the most vibrant and tactile glazes,” and Otto and Vivika Heino “for their tenacity and dedication to the process.” Anton, who can be found nearly every day at the wheel in her studio, hopes that her work occupies its own space within the milieu of California pottery. “The legacy of clay in California is huge, but I feel like since my work dabbles in both the design world as well as the craft world, I hope that it transcends both, to be able to stand the test of time.” Her lamps are sold to the trade through six showrooms across the country. Click here for a complete list.
May 9, 2011
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Friday Finds 5.06.11

Happy May 6th to you all. In this installment of Friday Finds, creative appendages, cork lamps, mid-century mosaics, and the story of Danny and Annie by StoryCorps and the Rauch Brothers. The animated short starts with how a Brooklyn couple were married, and how they coped with terminal illness. If there's one video you watch today, make it this one.
May 6, 2011
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Nathan Vincent's Locker Room

Artist Nathan Vincent, will be showing his new work at the Bellevue Arts Museum through June 26th. Vincent's work utilizes crochet and yarn to recreate many masculine objects in a new softer form. He's knitted taxidermy busts, urinals, guns, and tools.  The exhibit at Bellevue, "The Mysterious Content of Softness" features 11 national and international artists including Nathan Vincent and Lauren DiCioccio, all working with fiber in various techniques: knitting, weaving, and crochet.  Nathan's piece "Locker Room" is exactly what fans of the artist's work would expect. He's recreated a locker room entirely of yarn. Urinals, lockers, showers, and benches trade wood and metal for yarn and foam.   Photos by Steven Miller.
April 29, 2011
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Materials for Consideration

Galerie Kreo is one of the most unique spaces I know of for design. The gallery, run by Didier and Clémence Krzentowski, sees itself as a 'research laboratory,' commissioning and displaying one-off and limited-edition pieces by the likes of Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, Pierre Charpin, Hella Jongerius, Jasper Morrison, and Martin Szekely.  When I was in Paris earlier this year I caught their wonderful exhibition of work by L'ECAL students and teachers, "A New Generation of Lights."  Their current show is "Matières à réflexion," or "Materials for Consideration," and it looks like a good one. It's been extended till May 15, so if you can, check it out in person. If not, here's a virtual sampling of the works on view.
April 27, 2011
Buildings seen from our Penthouse terrace framed pops of color perfectly.

Colors of Iceland

I just returned from a four-day trip to Reykjavik and am still filled with excitement. Though the sky was grey for most of my time in Iceland, the visit was anything but dark and gloomy. The colors found all around the country, from the landscape to the cityscape to the clothes people wore, spanned the full spectrum. Buildings stretched across the city's skyline were dotted in teal, brick red, and mustard. Shops were filled with traditional knitwear in elaborate patterns and avant-garde pieces (think Bjork) in bold primary colors. With every coffee shop I popped my head into and every corner I turned, I was treated with flash upon flash of color statements and mixes. The architecture, the sweaters, the bikes, and the cars were painted in pop washes that complimented the bright, cheery moods of the Icelanders I met during my stay—and provided ample ammo to fight away the solemn skies and hail showers that plagued our trip.
April 26, 2011
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