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<i>Anemone</i> is a temporary installation in Taipei, Taiwan made of 30,000 rubber tubes to create an undulating surface that invites interaction and public engagement.

The Making of Screenplay: Part 2

Jenny Wu, a partner at Oyler Wu Collaborative, documents the process from design through fabrication of their latest installation, Screenplay, to be featured at the upcoming Dwell on Design 2012. Part 2:Line-work. Line-work has been an obsession of our office for the past ten years. While most often the study of lines is understood as two-dimensional and graphical, our interest in line-work is three-dimensional and spatial. This begs the question: How does a single line become spatial? Well, the simple answer is—it doesn’t. A line only becomes three-dimensional when it becomes part of an aggregation of multiple lines that are not co-planar. (Ok, I know I’m geeking out a bit, so bear with me!)
April 11, 2012
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The Making of Screenplay: Part 1

Jenny Wu, a partner at Oyler Wu Collaborative, documents the process from design through fabrication of their latest installation, Screenplay, to be featured at the upcoming Dwell on Design 2012. Part 1: Introduction. Several months ago, Michael Sylvester, managing director of Dwell on Design, approached us about designing and constructing an installation for the upcoming Dwell on Design show in June. I was really excited about finally showing a piece at Dwell, but equally as nervous about the challenges, ranging from design to fabrication to material issues—sourcing the building material as well as designing the process of how we will actually build it. Although these concerns are things that we have become quite accustomed to through our previous work, unforeseeable challenges always seem to pop up along the way that force us to be both resourceful and inventive about resolving them.
April 3, 2012
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Friday Finds 03.30.12

In this installment of Friday Finds, a look at tennis's most entertaining athlete, Pantone swatches that are good enough to eat, and answers to all the grade-schol test questions you never knew. Scroll down for more!
March 30, 2012
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DesignMarch Iceland 2012

For the fourth year in a row, product designers, architects, artists, and fashionistas opened their studio doors across Reykjavik, Iceland, for DesignMarch, a four-day roaming festival of art, design, crafts, whale foreskin cowboy boots, and late night parties soaked in birch-flavored schnapps. This year's event, held from March 22–25, attracted an estimated 35,000 people (about a tenth of the country's total population) and offered a frost-covered window into the burgeoning, wildly energetic—and sometimes wildly weird—design scene of the most northern capital on Earth.
March 27, 2012
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Friday Finds 03.16.12

We just firmed up our NCAA brackets in the Dwell office (Kentucky all the way!) but the one we're really curious about is Obama's. We also wish a Happy Birthday to another office favorite, SF Giants' Brian Wilson, who turns 30 today. Scroll down for the rest of our Friday Finds.
March 16, 2012
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Friday Finds 03.09.12

For your Friday amusement, five finds from the staff of Dwell. Scroll down for more.
March 9, 2012
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Coolest Homes for Artists & Art Collectors

We at Dwell are always on the lookout for unique homes that express the personality of their occupants—and it's no wonder some of the most unique and memorable residences we've featured in recent years belong to artists and art collectors, who embrace the quirky and the unconventional. Here's a peek at some of our favorite homes designed around the display and making-of art, from a famous conceptual artist's industrial-inspired rowhouse in New York City to a street art collector's shipping crate-filled loft in San Francisco.
March 7, 2012
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Marrakech Biennale: Higher Atlas

The Marrakech Biennale is in its fourth go here in Morocco's cultural capitol, and though much of the citywide exhibition deals with photography, sculpture and the like, the main show Higher Atlas—installed in the never-completed Theatre Royale—is decidedly architectural. From a fully-erected Maine backwoods shack by Ethan Hayes-Chute to a massive satellite dish by German architect Jurgen Mayer H., these works of art must contend with the presence of a raw, unfinished building. Started decades ago as an opera house by the previous king, one gets the sense that the actual theater, done only in raw concrete, will never be finished. I had a splendid time wandering around the structure discovering installation after installation. With no information given about what each project is, who made it, or what it's made from, one had the sense of pure discovery walking around the building, like finding ancient frescoes in a ruin. The exhibit runs through June 3rd.
March 6, 2012
Net Installation by Numen

Floating Landscape Made of Net

I recently came across Numen's creative interactive installations, a mix between art and design, on the landscape architecture blog Landezine. These are the same guys who strung up an alien-like web of packing tape in Melbourne's Federation Square last year. Their most recent project, Net, is a series of flexible nets suspended in the air, connected at various points to create an undulating and disorienting landscape. Or, as the designers call it, a "community hammock."
March 5, 2012
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