Advertising
Advertising

Latest Articles in Green Architecture

Advertising
Spatially, lamesadevenn planned two types of rooms: Below the natural terrain would be private suites structured for quiet reflection and study; above grade would be the larger public gathering rooms for chatting, sharing thoughts, and generating new idea

lamesadevenn: Part Four

Site in hand, lamesadevenn began developing a design and program that would be cutting-edge and strikingly original—and of questionable feasibility. In this series, trace the evolution of lamesadevenn, an international collaborative of architects, product designers and communication specialists who are redefining how and why we design. They’ve brought in journalist Seth Biderman and illustrator Nacho Durá to chronicle their “living projects,” like the Rancho—a live/work space designed to foster community and sustainable values in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Part four: At the Drawing Board…
November 15, 2011
macleaod residence street view

Building Green in Albany

This year, Build it Green celebrates the completion of its 10,000th GreenPoint rated home. Through the Greenpoint system, Build it Green awards points for energy efficiency, resource conservation, indoor air quality, water conservation and community consideration in new projects as well as renovations. I recently toured a renovation in Albany, California, that fetched a whopping score of 231 out of 300 possible points. While every design gesture was carefully thought out to maximize its green potential, the home is remarkably comfortable and liveable and it doesn't feel like like a theoretical or conceptual exercise—everything just makes sense. Click through the slideshow for a look at the residence and the measures homeowner and architect Ian MacLeod undertook.
November 9, 2011
chip thumb

Mr. CHIP Goes to Washington

A highlight of this year's Solar Decathlon was the CHIP house, designed, built, and transported to Washington DC by a team of over 100 SCI-Arc and Caltech students. The uniquely puffy "outsulated"  CHIP house—the Compact, Hyper-Insulated Prototype—is an effort to "address the contemporary issues or sustainability, energy efficiency, and affordable housing through a built work." If you missed it during the Decathlon, you have a few additional opportunities to check it out, most notably an exhibition opening this Friday at SCI-Arc's Library Gallery. "Mr. CHIP Goes to Washington," running through December 16, displays through photographs, video, and time-lapse footage the "frantic month in Washington D.C. that is the culmination of the team's two-year effort to conceptualize and develop its proposition for a new sustainability."
October 25, 2011
zHome post3 thumb

A Zero-Energy Community: Part 3

Project Manager Brad Liljequist chronicles the building of the zHome, a ten-unit townhome in Issaquah, Washington—the first multifamily zero-energy community in the United States. Part 3: A Q&A With David Vandervort Architects.   For our blog today I am going to interview David Vandervort and Mark Weirenga with David Vandervort Architects, the Seattle-based architectural firm that designed zHome. They have a long history of sustainably designed single-family homes and remodel projects along with extensive low-rise multifamily experience. Their projects include the sustainable demonstration project NEXTHouse and an award winning LEED Gold custom residence. I have really enjoyed working with David and Mark over the last several years and deeply appreciate the “homey modern” aesthetic they brought to zHome—modern design that you’d actually want to live in.
October 13, 2011
Arkin IdeaGarden thumb

IdeaGarden Eco-Farmhouse

After Will Rosenzweig and Carla Fracchia bought this 100-year-old farmhouse in Healdsburg, California, they hired Arkin Tilt Architects and Earthtone Construction to make an eco-friendly example out of it. The house had good bones but it was "thermally challenged in both summer and winter," says architect Anni Tilt. Thanks to the addition of a new wrap of rigid insulation on the exterior, new windows throughout, a ventilated roof, and a new wing with shade overhangs, the house is transformed. "It now provides an entirely different level of comfort and performance—a quantum leap forward—which has transformed the way we use it," the owners report. Click through the slideshow to see how the architects and contractors turned the old and leaky structure into a model of energy-efficiency. All photos courtesy of Edward Caldwell (copyright 2011).
October 13, 2011
Hseih Ying Chun Portrait

Curry Stone Prize Winner Announced

Hats off to Taiwanese architect Hseih Ying-Chun for winning the Curry Stone Design Grand Prize and taking home the $100,000 grant. Created as a way to champion design with a social bent, the Curry Stone Design Prize honors innovators who create projects that improve daily living conditions for people around the world. Hseih Ying-Chun has been working mainly in rural areas to deploy disaster relief structures.
October 7, 2011
1 the place

lamesadevenn: Part Three

A joyous moment: The site that Alba and Lopez discovered, on the developing southside of Santa Fe, offered the space, the views, and a promising pack of neighbors. The land also came with a well, utility lines, an access drive and very liberal building covenants. If lamesadevenn had as much money as it did ideas, they would’ve bought the place on the spot. In this series, trace the evolution of lamesadevenn, an international collaborative of architects, product designers and communication specialists who are redefining how and why we design. They’ve brought in journalist Seth Biderman and illustrator Nacho Durá to chronicle their “living projects,” like the Rancho—a live/work space designed to foster community and sustainable values in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The project’s birth and site selection are chronicled in Part 1: A Vision is Born and Part 2: The Sweet Spot. Financing their project was the next hurdle, described here in Part 3: Spare Change?
October 6, 2011
Visitor tour the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 in Washington, D.C., Friday, Sept. 30, 2011, with Arlington, VA, left, and the Lincoln Memorial, right, in the background. (Credit: Stefano Paltera/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon)

Solar Decathlon Highlights

From September 23rd to October 2nd, Washington D.C.'s monuments to presidential greats and civic leaders, museums of art and history, and houses of government were juxtaposed with houses of another breed: the green and technologically-advanced. Once every two years since 2002, teams of students from all across the United States (and now all across the globe) congregate on the National Mall in a Department of Energy-sponsored competition to design and build energy-efficient, solar-powered homes. This year, in the Solar Decathlon's 5th competition, 20 teams from five countries presented their designs, which ranged from SCI-Arc and Caltech's highly conceptual "outsulated" CHIP house, to Appalachian State's Solar Homestead influenced by vernacular typologies, to the University of Maryland's WaterShed whose micro-wetland helps reduce water pollution. I toured the homes this weekend and share a few of my favorite designs.
October 3, 2011
Achieving zero net energy required integration with every aspect of zHome’s design. Even in initial site planning, we had to take into account solar heat gain and ensuring clear solar access to each unit’s roof.

A Zero-Energy Community: Part 2

Project Manager Brad Liljequist chronicles the building of the zHome, a ten-unit townhome in Issaquah, Washington—the first multifamily zero-energy community in the United States. Part 2: Building REALLY green... It's easier than you think. Forty percent. That’s the share of total CO2 emissions each year in the US that comes from energy used in buildings. Building operations—heating, cooling, lighting, and everything else inside the walls—are the single largest generator of carbon dioxide in the country. It’s an easy thing to forget about, sort of like background noise. But it’s there, humming along, 24/7.
September 28, 2011
Advertising
Advertising