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Dwell on Design: Outdoor Focus

Dwell on Design is bigger and better than ever, and that goes for our perennially popular Outdoor section, too. Located at the back of the 220,000-square-foot show floor, the area—peppered with olive trees, flowering plants, and real turf—transplants the outdoors into the convention center, and exerts an almost magnetic force on DOD attendees. The green oasis was designed by Shades of Green Landscape Architecture and expertly installed by FormLA Landscaping with trees from SWG Trees. This year it plays host to three fully furnished prefab houses, the new Airstream Sterling, designed by Christopher Deam, a ping-pong table, and plenty of places to lounge. Click through our slideshow for some of the highlights.
June 24, 2012
700 ladies and gentleman aura lights

A Chat with Remodelista: Market Highlights for 2012

DIY workshops aplenty and modern, hand-crafted goods such as lighting, hardware, and garden accessories are planned for Remodelista's third year at Dwell on Design. We speak with Editor-at-Large and Market Director, Sarah Lonsdale, for the inside scoop on the Market.
June 15, 2012
Egg Chair by Arne Jacobsen

Fritz Hansen on Knockoffs and Authentic Design

In recent years, the Danish furniture company Fritz Hansen has taken aggressive measures to protect their products against knockoffs and counterfeits across the globe. They have rounded up and destroyed numerous counterfeit Series 7 chairs (labeled incorrectly and illegally as Fritz Hansen products), identifying the pieces as fakes by their shoddy quality and lack of official identification (since 2006, all authentic Fritz Hansen products have a unique serial number and a tag with an invisible thread in it to validate its authenticity). They’ve also campaigned on the internet, releasing viral videos that show company employees stomping on fake Series 7 chairs (spoiler alert, they break) and then stomping on a real one (which bouncily absorbs the employee’s weight). Though their classic designs are thoroughly protected in Europe under Registered Community Design laws, they are not safeguarded in the U.S., where intellectual property protections are weaker and expire more quickly. Some, of course, see this as a good thing, as they return classic designs to the public realm for free and unrestrained reinterpretation by a new generation of designers—but that also opens things up to copycats.
June 13, 2012
Authentic furniture pieces by Herman Miller

Q&A with Herman Miller's Marg Mojzak

Whether our recent essay "The Real Cost of Rip-Offs" got you thinking about the dark side of the knockoff industry—or left you unfazed and unconvinced—we'd like to continue the conversation here on You can find some incendiary and thought-provoking quotes from some of the people I interviewed for the piece, but didn't have space to include in the magazine story, online here. We'll round out the coverage with a handful of Q&As and other posts over the next few weeks. I received one of the most passionate and in-depth responses to my questions from Marg Mojzak, Director of Retail for Herman Miller, who fired off a dissertation on the subject of authentic design. Here, she discusses her company's investments in both classic and new design, dispels what she sees as knockoff myths, and makes a case for the value of "authenticity."
May 30, 2012
A recent collaboration between Paulina Gonzalez-Ortega and Amaya Gutierrez,  the wall-mounted Perchero Coat Hanger ($275) is movable and re-arrangeable.

Made in Mexico Design

Last week, the MoMA Design Store in New York launched the latest installment in its Destination: Design series. Available only through June, Destination: Mexico is a limited-availability product collection featuring approximately 150 products by emerging Mexican designers, including home accessories, furniture, paper goods, and jewelry. Many of the products reimagine typical Mexican materials and techniques—such as a pre-Columbian-style pitcher rendered in polyester resin and a chair woven with ancient Mayan techniques that utilizes zinc-galvanized PVC string. The product collection focuses on designers who source local, recycled, and organic materials, and use production techniques that minimize waste. Many items are also produced with collectives who aim to create an opportunity for employment in small, rural villages and support the teaching of traditional crafts to a new generation. Here, a peek at some of our favorite finds from the collection, which is currently available for purchase on and in the MoMA Design stores in New York, Japan, and Korea.
May 8, 2012
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New Summer Colors from Heath Ceramics

I was in the Heath Ceramics shop in Los Angeles this past weekend, borrowing a few pieces for a photo shoot, and I spotted their lovely new Summer Collection, a limited-edition series of new colors and items available only through October 1st. The color palette—California Poppy, Grapefruit, and Birch—goes nicely with Heath's signature exposed clay, which peeks through at the rim or bases of bowls, vases, and cork-topped containers.
April 26, 2012
Bryant lamp by Schoolhouse Electric

Accessories from Schoolhouse Electric

I have always associated the Portland-based company Schoolhouse Electric solely with classic, vintage-inspired lighting, and only recently discovered that they sell much more than that in their retail showroom and online. Here are some of my favorite finds. Most of them are made in America, most are somewhat affordable, and all will add a stylish accent to your living space. Now's a great time to check out the site and pick up some treats for yourself or as gifts; they're offering 30% off on selected items as part of their "spring cleaning" sale.
April 10, 2012
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Inside Saturdays NYC

A surf shop in New York City? Unexpected, sure, but also incredibly chic. Saturdays NYC was founded by three friends, avid surfers who "saw a massive opportunity to bring the surf scene to the city," says co-founder Josh Rosen. Their first shop opened on Crosby Street in Soho a few years ago, and an outpost opened in Tokyo as well. (And in case you're wondering, "Tokyo's surf scene is a lot like New York City's—it's about 45 minutes to the beach from both places," says Rosen). Next up is another shop in New York in the West Village. The original shop is built out with salvaged wood, slate, and metal, and stocks surfboards, wetsuits, books, art, and the shop's own brand of 50s– and 60s–inspired apparel. There's also a coffee bar, made from found wainscoting and Ikea butcher block, and an appealing patio out back. Here's a peek inside.
March 29, 2012
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Inga Sempe's Risotto Spoon

We at Dwell are big fans of French designer Inga Sempé's work; we've profiled her in 2007; ran a Q&A from Milan on in 2009; and most recently highlighted the making-of her already iconic Ruché sofa and, online, traced her design and prototyping process. So we were excited to hear about her most recent design, the IS01, a graceful stainless steel spoon intended for serving risotto, which won Domus and Alessi's "Design a Spoon" competition, held to celebrate the 50-year anniversary of the Italian cookbook Cucchiaio d’Argento (Silver Spoon).
March 23, 2012