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All photographs by <a href="http://heribertoibarra.zenfolio.com/">Heriberto Ibarra</a>.

Light Lines Exhibition

We at Dwell know Jay Atherton and Cy Keener mostly as architects; we profiled them and their beautiful extreme-minimalist house in Phoenix in our December/January 2011 issue (story online here). But they also explore their concepts and interests through the medium of installation art, including a show that featured 1,200 pounds of slowly melting and dripping ice at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art last summer. So I was intrigued to hear about their latest project, an exhibition entitled "Light Lines" at the University of Texas at El Paso's Stanlee and Gerald Rubin Center for the Visual Arts, on view until September 21st. Using simple materials—wire, eye hooks, paper soaked with plaster, mirrors—the show has transformed the Rubin Gallery into a vessel of light. Sculpted walkways reflect and refract sunlight from mirrors that are strategically placed in the hills surrounding the Rubin Center. Here's a look at the exhibition, as well as a behind-the-scenes peek at the installation process. All photographs by Heriberto Ibarra.
August 2, 2011
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Kamal Letterpress Art

I stumbled onto Kamal Patel's letterpress work in the Chronicle Books 2010 publication The Little Book of Letterpress, which highlights work by letterpress studios around the globe. The work by her Richmond, Virginia-based studio, Kamal, impressed me with its ornate patterns couched within a modern aesthetic. "The peacock has always been one of my favorite animals, and I wanted to capture their bold colors and swirling patterns simply and graphically," she's quoted as saying in the book, describing one of the suites of letterpressed cards she's developed.
July 19, 2011
Untitled. From series "Color Berlin," 2009.

Matthias Heiderich's Berlin

Self-taught photographer Matthias Heiderich has spent the past three years roaming around Berlin, snapping photos with his medium-format film camera and Pentax digital camera. During his "phototrips," usually conducted on bike while listening to electronic and neoclassical music, he keeps an eye out for "lines, patterns, colors, and interesting forms/shapes" and captures what he finds in often abstract and angular compositions. His Berlin is a place of saturated color and deep turquoise sky, of time-stopped buildings and signage. Many of these pieces are available for purchase as prints, and very affordable ones at that.
May 25, 2011
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New Olds at Israeli Design Museum

There's an interesting new museum in Israel, just south of Tel Aviv, with a corkscrewing exterior of rust-red Cor-Ten steel: Design Museum Holon, designed by Ron Arad. Their forthcoming exhibition is especially compelling. "New Olds: Design Between Tradition and Innovation" will run May 26 through September 10, curated by Volker Albus in collaboration with the Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen. The wide-ranging show spotlights works by over sixty Israeli and international designers who straddle tradition and innovation, drawing inspiration from historical references and symbols ranging from cuckoo clocks and deer antlers to traditional porcelain and Baroque objects. Maarten Baas, for example, has reinterpreted the mundane white plastic garden chair, melding it with a hand-carved wooden chair; Frank Willems bends and twists mattresses to form chairs and stools. If you happen to be in Israel over the next few months, check it out—especially if you can visit during one of the accompanying lectures, given by international designers and 18 up-and-coming and established Israeli designers. Here's a peek at what's on view, along with some commentary on each piece by Albus and Galit Gaon, the chief curator of the museum.
May 13, 2011
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Zaha Hadid's Milan Installation

As part of last month's Milan Design Week, Zaha Hadid Architects teamed with LEA Ceramiche to create "Twirl," a mesmerizing installation in the 18th-century courtyard of the State University in Milan. It was up for only a week and has since been disassembled, but since I just received some beautiful pictures of the piece I figured I'd share.
May 10, 2011
"Stephen Burks: Man Made" will be on view at the Studio Museum in Harlem until June 26th, 2011. Photo by Kevin Kunstandt & Andrew Kenney.

Q&A with Stephen Burks

I ventured to Stephen Burks' "Man Made" exhibit a few days after returning home to New York City from a trip to India. The colors and textures of Indian culture, though not directly referenced, were present in Burks' show, a mix of modern shapes and materials with age-old tradition and craftsmanship. He calls this work—which couples diverse cultural influences with design—"hybrid." After a studio visit in Williamsburg, I sat down with Burks to discuss his concept of a hybrid, his world travels, and the one brand he wants to work with more than any other.  
April 11, 2011
A peek into the San Francisco Museum of Craft and Folk Art from the street.

MOCFA's "E is for Everyone"

The Museum of Craft and Folk Art in San Francisco, in honor of the 25th anniversary of Sister Corita Kent—a west coast Pop artist, teacher, and, yes, one-time Catholic nun—has organized a major exhibition showcasing her work. Corita left the church in 1969 after being labeled “a guerilla with a paintbrush," and died in 1986 from cancer. "E is for Everyone: Celebrating Sister Corita" shows the many dimensions of the artist who revolutionized graphic design and created an art education system in which the classroom became a lab for learning and making. To put that philosophy in action, the museum has organized a slew of special hands-on events over the course of the exhibition's run (through June 5), including a silk-screening 'Craft Bar' open to the public on May 5, and family-friendly art-making sessions on April 9 and May 14. Here's a peek at some highlights of the show. All photos by Tomo Saito.
March 21, 2011
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Rayko's Plastic Camera Show

If you're in San Francisco this Friday, stop by RayKo Photo Center for the opening reception of their 4th International Juried Plastic Camera Show—featuring images by 80 different photographers from around the world, including Thomas Alleman, Sam Grant, and Michelle Bates (author of the book “Plastic Cameras: Toying with Creativity"). In this age of Hipstamatic iPhone apps and Photoshop effects, it's refreshing to see images produced with film and actual analog cameras. The pieces will be on display through April 30th. I myself just receieved one of Lomography's latest plastic cameras—the Diana Mini En Rose—which I plan on taking out for a spin soon, and sharing on Dwell.com. In the meantime, here is some plastic camera inspiration.
February 25, 2011
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Conflict Kitchen Rises Again

If you're ever in Pittsburgh, you must swing by Conflict Kitchen for lunch—as I wrote in the December/January issue (and online here) it is an artist-run take-out window in Pittsburgh, selling street food solely from countries the United States is in conflict with, in three-month rotations. Artist and professor Jon Rubin, who founded the project last year, recently wrote me to say they'd shuttered the Kitchen's first iteration—Kudideh Kitchen, selling Iranian sandwiches—and reopened as Bolani Pazi, an Afghan take-out restaurant that serves a savory homemade afghan turnover filled with either pumpkin, spinach, lentils, or potatoes and leeks.
February 15, 2011
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