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Latest Articles in Hallway

dillon residence night

Seamless Living in Brisbane

For their family home in Brisbane, Australia, John and Cathy Dillon spent countless hours poring over design magazines and books to strike the right updated-mid-century-modern balance. "We drew heavily from the mid-century modern ethic in terms of house design and layout, but did not wish to replicate this era through furnishings and fixtures," says John Dillon. While the structural influences of this home by local architect Bud Brannigan range from the Case Study work of Pierre Koning and Craig Ellwood, and Australian architects Glenn Murcutt and Harry Seidler, the interiors are a mix of the residents' own personalities and histories, including a love of Japanese design and art collecting.
January 30, 2012
modern perpetual calendars

On and On

December 2, 2011
red painted tunnel kitchen dining room

Tunnel Vision

To maximize every square inch in this Manhattan apartment, LOT-EK knocked down walls, added dozens of recycled doors, and built in a bevy of secret compartments.
November 5, 2011
randy brown omaha nebraska slat house

Slat Happy

Budget supplies become modern design gold in this Omaha home.
November 1, 2011
In her spacious kitchen, Mahnaz Fashandi prepares for Persian New Year with her brother Mohsen and her parents Mohammad and Azam.

Family Matters

The open spaces and transparency of modern architecture turn out to be extremely useful when there’s a house full of relatives.
July 18, 2011
In renovating the Barcelona apartment she shares with Sergio Carratala, Petz Scholtus was guided by what she calls the “5 Rs” of eco-design: reuse, reduce, recycle, restore, respect.

Green Living in Barcelona

For some, living “green” is all about making a statement. But for Petz Scholtus, it boils down to common sense. The eco-designer was raised on a farm in Luxembourg, and she’s brought a feeling for the natural world to her residence in Barcelona, Spain. “Growing up on a farm influenced my ideas,” she explains. “There it was all about life cycles, materials that flow, eating, composting, growing...”   Scholtus, who also runs her own sustainable-products studio, Pöko Design, moved to Barcelona in 2004. Three years later, she and her partner, Sergio Carratala, a structural engineer, found a nearly-625-square-foot apartment in an 18th-century building at the heart of the Barri Gòtic.   Their plan was simple: Use eco-friendly and recycled materials, reduce water and energy consumption and create as little waste as possible. While sacrificing neither aesthetics nor comfort, Scholtus has accomplished that and more. There are cabinets made from wooden wine boxes, cork floors installed without glue, PVC-free pipes, secondhand furniture and even a worm-composting enterprise on one of the tiny balconies. No detail was too insignificant—witness the Staple-Free Stapler in the office.  
April 11, 2011
“When I first thought of moving to Harlem, I looked at a map,” says Ryall. “The island’s about 210 blocks long, I’m near 110th Street—I thought, ‘It’s right in the center of Manhattan.’”

Manhattan

Like many white people of a certain age, I first visited Harlem by mistake. I took the wrong subway and barely got out of the station: First one guy, then another, tried to shove me down the stairs. Thirty-two years later, walking past the gourmet markets, wine shops, and chain drugstores that are the sine qua non of change, I am struck by the Asians and Caucasians on their way to work, none scurrying with the head-down haste of the unwelcome. Harlem may still be the global capital of the African Diaspora, yet no court could have integrated it as efficiently as the lure of affordable Manhattan real estate. Nowadays, everyone takes the A train.
February 14, 2011
slade thumb

Magnetic Walls, and Storage Made Sexy

When architects Hayes and James Slade of Slade Architecture renovated a three-story brownstone in Brooklyn for Ricky Kenig, the owner of the New York City's ubiquitous Ricky's NYC stores, and his three daughters, they took an atypical approach to storage: "rather than concealing, it reveals and celebrates," says James. To tie the three floors together, the architects devised a blackened steel wall that acts like a multi-story magnetic board, running from the parlor floor to the roof.
November 17, 2010
key holder Cubby

A Bolder Key Holder

We recently received a letter from Dwell reader Paula Pollachek asking for suggestions for a container in which to “collect all of your belongings, like keys, phone, and wallet, in one place for one person.” Here are some obvious, and not-so-obvious, options.
January 22, 2009
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