Latest Articles in Wood

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Adventures in Oz

Having admired a project by Shane Blue of Bourne + Blue Architecture in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia, James and Sue O’Sullivan asked the architect to help them create a beachside family compound in Diamond Beach, about a two-hour drive from their main house. Completed this year, the resulting structure, which comprises four main components wrapped around a central courtyard, easily accommodates the couple and their five children, ranging in age from 23 to 16, as well as extended family and friends. To keep maintenance costs down and to reduce the sizeable home’s carbon footprint, Blue used composite plywood and plantation pine throughout, as well as low-VOC paint, low-e glazing and LED lighting. He installed photovoltaic panels, a hot-water recirculating pump and two large corrugated steel bins that store 5,000 gallons of rainwater just outside the building. When the O’Sullivans aren’t using the house, which was completed in spring, they allow it to be used as a vacation rental.
December 6, 2010
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Text Appeal

Will Robison and Jacob Krupnick believe that transforming basic transactions into “retail experiments” will change the rapport we have with what we buy. Subports launched in late 2009 as a techie, Brooklyn-based, text-to-buy business model—–a one-time online registration links your credit card information to your cell phone number, and purchases are made by sending an SMS—–but the implications of the service subvert the conventional add-to-shopping-cart experience. 
November 24, 2010
atherton keener window

Startin' Spartan

When Jay Atherton and Cy Keener met in grad school at the University of California, Berkeley, they discovered in each other a rare constellation of common interests: minimalist architecture, rock climbing, and “not talking.” After graduation, Atherton moved back to his hometown of Phoenix, Arizona, and purchased a downtown lot. Wanting to build a house, he asked Keener—–a pro carpenter, then living in Colorado—–to help with design and construction. Six months later, “His house became our house,” says Keener. “It became obvious the only way it would get built was if I shared the mortgage.” Atherton cackles: “I suckered him down here.” The roommates are now business partners: They founded a design firm, Atherton Keener, in 2007. On a 110-degree day, they invited us in for a tour.   
November 22, 2010
Sustainable cabin with hooded deck exterior near Vancouver

Escape to the Rock

Off the coast of British Columbia—on a site accessible only by boat—a family of Vancouver urbanites commissioned a sustainable cabin for weekend getaways that feels a world away.
November 10, 2010
Modern small space bedroom nook with stairs

The Manhattan Transformation

As head of retail development and legal counsel leasing for American Apparel, Michael Pozner spends a lot of time sorting out the details when a new venue is chosen for the brand’s purposes. But, he admits, “I’m not a big architectural design guy.” So when he decided to reinvent the diminutive Manhattan studio in which he lives and works, Pozner tapped Darrick Borowski of Jordan Parnass Digital Architecture with whom he’d collaborated on multiple American Apparel stores. Pozner explains what happened when, architecturally speaking, he took his work home with him.
November 4, 2010
Front room with floor-to-ceiling windows

Airy Live/Work Studio Space in Toronto

In Toronto, a painter accustomed to crashing in his studio created an airy artistic haven with both working and living quarters for a more balanced and polished picture.
October 25, 2010
Multi-floored housing complex in San Francisco, California

Sands Castle

Jeff and Larissa Sand cut their commute down to a few flights of stairs when they moved their industrial design studio, architecture office, and metalwork shop into the first two floors of their home in San Francisco.
October 18, 2010
Modern two-story home with mirrored siding and plate-glass windows

Reflects Well

 “The first floor was about making something warm and woody that would blend into the natural environment,” architect Stephen Chung says of his Wayland, Massachusetts, home. “The second floor was a chance to experiment.”
October 18, 2010
Screen-printing home studio

Undivided Intentions

The late architect David Boone was always one to take his work home with him—he just kept it in the home’s office. The new residents of his 1972 house embrace a more fluid approach to the live/work divide.
October 18, 2010