Latest Articles in Textile

5 cardigan bay Blodwen Blanket

Cardigan Bay's Textile Design Revolution

It seems an unlikely place to come across a design revolution, but if you venture into the valleys of the Pembrokeshire coast in west Wales you will find a thriving creative community. Inspired by their industrial heritage and spurred by the economic downturn, small businesses and enterprises in the Cardigan Bay area are working hard to keep their local skills and manufacturing traditions alive. “At some point you realize that we are going to have to start making stuff again,” explains Cardigan Bay-based David Hieatt, founder of Hiut Denim—a brand name that merges his surname with the word utility. It’s a sentiment that’s echoed across the many of the creative businesses in the area. “The recession has made us realize that to buy less but better is something we have to get back to,” says Hieatt. “It’s an ethos that society started out with many years ago and the recession has helped us to rediscover it.” Provenance is certainly a buzzword in retail at the moment, and products made in Cardigan Bay have it by the bucket load. Amanda Griffiths, of local woolen mill Melin Tregwynt, attributes the area’s surge in creativity to the quality of life that it offers and the inspiration the landscape provides. “It’s always been a creative area full of crafts people—we joke that it’s Wales’ answer to California.” This combination of history, natural resources, craft, passion, and ideas creates ideal growing conditions for new and old manufacturing businesses. Dwell tracks down three of the area’s entrepreneurs to find out how they are turning to the triumphs of the past to find success in the present.
July 11, 2012
modern gray beanbag armchair with blue Cordonnet stitching

Frolla Armchair by Skitsch

Beanbag chairs are mainstays in most family rooms, dens, and children's rooms and it's no wonder since they're casual, comfortable, and easy to move. Italian design company Skitsch just launched its Frolla armchair, an updated version of the beanbag chair that channels the informal vibe of the original but gives it a more supportive structure and sophisticated form. Designed by Andrea Radice and Folco Orlandini, Frolla is the perfect perch in which to curl up with a good book, plop down in front of the tube, or spend a lazy summer afternoon. The removable cover features cordonnet stitching in an electric blue yarn and the base fabric comes in a beige or grey cotton. Retail price is €590. Visit for more information.
July 10, 2012
Handkercheif by Nienke Voorintholt for the Lloyd Hotel

Sleeping In: The World’s Slowest Hotel

Hulking on the edge of the trendy Eastern Docklands in Amsterdam, the Lloyd Hotel is a storied mammoth. It was first an emigrant hotel for moneyed travelers before they set sail for the Americas (after a stint in the adjacent Quarantine building for a thorough scrubbing down); when the Germans occupied, it was converted into a prison for members of the resistance; in the late 1980s and early 1990s, the artists came. The building, a repository of three generations of European history, reopened in 2004 as a hotel once again, and Cultural Embassy. For the past two years, it has also been the site of a massive slowing down.
June 25, 2012
teixidors blankets stack

Blankets by Teixidors and Christian Zuzunaga

One of our new favorite product lines spotted at this year's ICFF is from Spanish company Teixidors, a small-scale textile maker that weaves its wares in Terrassa, a city in Catalonia. Established in 1983, Teixidors has a laudable social mission—it aims to employ people with learning disabilities to operate their hand looms—and environmental ethic—it uses natural materials farmed in a responsible manner.
June 19, 2012
Egg Chair by Arne Jacobsen

Fritz Hansen on Knockoffs and Authentic Design

In recent years, the Danish furniture company Fritz Hansen has taken aggressive measures to protect their products against knockoffs and counterfeits across the globe. They have rounded up and destroyed numerous counterfeit Series 7 chairs (labeled incorrectly and illegally as Fritz Hansen products), identifying the pieces as fakes by their shoddy quality and lack of official identification (since 2006, all authentic Fritz Hansen products have a unique serial number and a tag with an invisible thread in it to validate its authenticity). They’ve also campaigned on the internet, releasing viral videos that show company employees stomping on fake Series 7 chairs (spoiler alert, they break) and then stomping on a real one (which bouncily absorbs the employee’s weight). Though their classic designs are thoroughly protected in Europe under Registered Community Design laws, they are not safeguarded in the U.S., where intellectual property protections are weaker and expire more quickly. Some, of course, see this as a good thing, as they return classic designs to the public realm for free and unrestrained reinterpretation by a new generation of designers—but that also opens things up to copycats.
June 13, 2012
Interior designed by Kathryn Tyler

Interiors by Kathryn Tyler, Linea Studio

Judging by all the great feedback we've received on Kathryn Tyler's lovely Falmouth, England, home (Collector's Choice, June 2012), you all loved her style—and awesome collections of vintage furniture and cookware—as much as we did. Tyler founded her interior design studio, Linea Studio, in 2004. Based in Cornwall, she is currently at work on a diverse array of projects, from a bar in Edinburgh to a new coffee shop in South Africa to a windmill in the Netherlands that she's converting into a recording studio. Here's a peek at some other projects she's recently finished.
June 12, 2012
Exterior of the NoMad Hotel in New York

The NoMad Hotel, New York

One block away from the scene-making New York outpost of the Ace Hotel, in a district mostly known for its wholesale garment industry, is a Beaux Arts showstopper anchoring the corner of Broadway and 28th Street. The recently-opened NoMad Hotel, distinct from the exterior owing to its giant cupola, is not just a coincidence but a companion property (and aesthetic foil) to the Ace. Both were developed by The Sydell Group in partnership with GFI Development, who hired Parisian designer Jacques Garcia to give the NoMad interiors a whiff of the grand dame. During its soft opening this spring, we took a whirl around the hotel, which pairs traditional, swank, and very French interior design moves with a decidedly modern, zeitgeist-y, and still very New York feel. 
June 5, 2012
orange Tresse rug by Samuel Accoceberry for Chevalier Edition

Graphic Carpet Ride

June 5, 2012
Facade of Hotel Lautner in Desert Hot Springs, California

A John Lautner-Designed Hotel

A major perk of reporting the story "John Lautner's Desert Rose" for our June 2012 issue? Actually spending a night at the Hotel Lautner in Desert Hot Springs, California, which has been resurrected and reimagined by the uber-talented designers Tracy Beckmann and Ryan Trowbridge. I brought along a camera and snapped some photos while the duo toured me around the four-room inn, which the legendary architect John Lautner designed in 1947 as a model for a master-planned desert community that never came to be. Click through the slideshow to see highlights of a little-known mid-century icon that has been lovingly brought back to life. And if you like what you see and want to hear more about the renovation process, come see Beckmann and Trowbridge talk at Dwell on Design on Sunday, June 24.
May 31, 2012