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Latest Articles in Interviews

milton glaser portrait1

An Afternoon with Milton Glaser

Meeting design legend Milton Glaser was one of those classic moments that can only happen in New York City. I was having lunch with Alan Heller—the man behind the furniture manufacturing company Heller Inc.—when he scribbled Milton Glaser's number on a napkin, insisting I meet him. I called Milton the next day, and in turn, he invited me to his studio on East 32nd Street in Manhattan. I spent a few hours talking about history, both Milton's and New York's in equal measure, and parts of that special day are captured below.
May 26, 2011
pinkeye shoe supply

Shoe Supply's Upcycled Design

Belgian design firm Pinkeye recently created a retail space for Antwerp's Shoe Supply that upcycles an entire classroom. Situated on a quiet side street in the city's main retail district, the shop's off-the-beaten path locale tasked the designers with a hefty challenge: create an attention grabbing concept that would have mass appeal—and do it on the cheap. A local school was shuttered and instead of letting its contents lay to waste, the designers took desks, maps, lockers, chemistry flasks, and lamps to create this retro-inspired sneaker shop.
May 25, 2011
Lissoni is interviewed on his Extrasoft modular sofa in white, defined by its geometric configuration and irregular contours.

10 Minutes With Piero Lissoni

Italian architect and designer Piero Lissoni spent an evening at the Graye showroom in Los Angeles last week at a gathering to celebrate his furniture designs for Living Divani and Porro, which Graye reps in the States. Hosted by Graye owner Maria Cicione, the event was focused around Lissoni’s recent work, including thoughtfully designed sofas, beds, chairs and shelving and storage units. Lissoni, soft-spoken and humble, explained his approach to each design in a quick, ten-minute interview.
May 19, 2011
dieter rams vitsoe

30 Minutes With Dieter Rams

The word "icon" is thrown around rather freely in the design world, but when discussing Dieter Rams and his body of work, it is the only word that sticks. Last week, on the morning after attending the opening of 60s 606 is 50, an exhibition at the New York City Vitsoe shop celebrating 50 years of Rams’ 606 Universal Shelving System, I was lucky enough to sit down for 30 quick minutes with the legend. Joining us in the dining room of the Mark Hotel is Mark Adams, Vitsoe's managing director. The conversation was less an interview and more a glimpse into a conversation between two old friends and colleagues, part of which is captured below.
May 18, 2011
jonathan adler portrait

Jonathan Adler

Seventeen years ago, Jonathan Adler wasn’t a brand, he was a one-man full-time pottery production operation—“making, glazing, firing, packing, and shipping every single piece I made.” After successfully pitching an initial order for Barneys, he expanded his empire to eponymous shops in major cities across the United States and an online catalog featuring goods that range from ceramic rhinoceros boxes to wool area rugs to lamps and candleholders. Developing his business savvy alongside his ever-expanding collection was an organic process for Adler, one that has allowed the potter to grow with his company. “Getting out from behind the wheel has enabled me to be infinitely more creative,” he says.
May 17, 2011
chris hardy portrait

Chris Hardy Design

Name the hubs for emerging American designers and you'll likely hear the usual suspects of Seattle, San Francisco, and Brooklyn. Look southward, too, though, for a crop of energetic young guns set on making their mark. One such designer, Atlanta-based Chris Hardy, enticed the iconic Italian lighting manufacturer FontanaArte to produce his new Wig lamp. After returning from Milan, where Chris debuted Wig, the young designer chatted with me about FontanaArte, the state of contemporary American design, and Atlanta's burgeoning design scene. "It's nice to see that design is infused in the culture here—even if it is on a small scale," he says speaking of a few streets named after historic design figures.
May 16, 2011
wrk shp isoda

Merging Architecture and Fashion

Blurred disciplinary lines are visible throughout the design world. Architects moonlight as furniture designers, artists as product designers, and it seems almost everyone has had a stint as a jewelry designer. One of my favorite overlaps is architecture and fashion: garments and structures offer protection from the elements, provide an expressive face to the world, and, well, just look damn fine while doing so. You can only imagine my delight when the work of Airi Isoda and her architecturally influenced fashions crossed my desk.
May 10, 2011
anton

Lesley Anton's Ceramic Muses

Citing inspirations ranging from the rocks of Joshua Tree to sand dunes, bamboo and her grandmother’s milk-glass hobnail bottles, Los Angeles-based ceramist Lesley Anton began her craft with clay classes at the 92nd Street Y in New York City. She worked out of her garage and backyard in Los Angeles for nine years before moving into a studio with a storefront in which she displays her functional work, consisting of bowls, mugs and utensil vessels. Anton is inspired by ceramists Beatrice Wood “for her creativity and flat out ballsiness,” Adam Silverman “for his peaceful, minimal profiles with the most vibrant and tactile glazes,” and Otto and Vivika Heino “for their tenacity and dedication to the process.” Anton, who can be found nearly every day at the wheel in her studio, hopes that her work occupies its own space within the milieu of California pottery. “The legacy of clay in California is huge, but I feel like since my work dabbles in both the design world as well as the craft world, I hope that it transcends both, to be able to stand the test of time.” Her lamps are sold to the trade through six showrooms across the country. Click here for a complete list.
May 9, 2011
Greensburg GreenTown Conversation

Daniel Wallach of GreenTown

After an EF5 tornado devestated the tiny town of Greensburg, Kansas, (then populartion 1,500) in 2007, the residents came together and did the unbelievable: Rebuilt as a sustainable town. Leading the charge were the mayor, city administrator, city council president (who assumed the role of mayor just three weeks after the storm), the governor (then Kathleen Sebelius), and two residents from nearby Stafford County: Daniel Wallach and Catherine Hart. In January, we sent photographer Alec Soth to document the town as it is today, nearly four years after the tornado struck, for our May 2011 Photo Issue. Here, we chat in further depth with Wallach about the days after the storm and the latest construction and developments.  
April 21, 2011
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