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  1. Steelwood Chair: Perimeters
    How To

    Steelwood Chair: Perimeters

    The next tool makes a perpendicular fold around the sheet’s perimeter, which allows the hard edges to be folded away from the smooth backrest. Parts of this fold will become armrests. &ldquo...

    01.01.09

  2. Steelwood Chair: Cuts, Curves, Cuts
    How To

    Steelwood Chair: Cuts, Curves, Cuts

    The tool that folds the curve of the back of the chair is the most dramatic, but it is no more essential than the others, which trim the edges, cut the holes, and add a final soft angle to the...

    01.01.09

  3. How To

    Steelwood Chair: Fitting Wood

    Four straight legs and a round seat are CNC-milled out of solid beech, bolt holes and all, ready for fixing to the punched and painted steel. As the chair began production in early 2008, the...

    01.01.09

  4. Flos Glo-Ball
    How To

    Flos Glo-Ball

    Designers and manufacturers bemoan the profusion of cheaply made copycats, but it’s been proven time and again that truly great design can never be obscured by poor imitation. For evidence, look no...

    written by: Virginia Gardiner
    photos by: Alex Subrizi
    01.25.09

  5. Flos Glo-Ball: Molten Dust
    How To

    Flos Glo-Ball: Molten Dust

    Piombino Dese, a drab industrial town between Venice and Verona, has many small glass companies, including Vetrerie New Glass, founded by Franco Pellizzon in 1991 and one of several Glo-Ball...

    01.01.09

  6. Flos Glo-Ball: Blow Mold
    How To

    Flos Glo-Ball: Blow Mold

    When the blob has reached a diameter of about six inches, it has already been handled by two or three blowers, who multitask like chefs.

    01.01.09

  7. How To

    Flos Glo-Ball: Cool and Cut

    Vetrerie New Glass can make 18 Glo-Balls per hour—Pellizzon keeps the operation tight in order to guarantee exceptional quality. The balls sit in a slow-cooling kiln for two hours; otherwise, they...

    01.01.09

  8. Flos Glo-Ball: Put Together
    How To

    Flos Glo-Ball: Put Together

    West of Piombino Dese, in Bovezzo, the well-tended Glo-Balls meet the other parts of the lamp: laminated tubular steel stands, bases, and electronic components sourced in Milan.

    01.01.09

  9. Little Field of Flowers
    How To

    Little Field of Flowers

    Nanimarquina—In 1987, Barcelona-based designer Nani Marquina established a textile and rug design studio. Since 1993, the company’s designs have been manufactured in northern India....

    written by: Virginia Gardiner
    01.25.09

  10. How To

    Little Field of Flowers: Die Cutting

    As Boontje’s signature style is often associated with cutouts, Marquina’s solution was a good fit. Sheets of felt from Rajasthan go into a die cutter, which is essentially a combination of a waffle...

    01.01.09

  11. Little Field of Flowers: Weaving
    How To

    Little Field of Flowers: Weaving

    Depending on the size of the rug—they come in three sizes—one or two technicians at SPN operate the loom, which involves painstaking manual labor. “Every two or three lines,” Marquina explains, “we...

    01.01.09

  12. How To

    Prep

    Zippers, buttons, and other add-ons are rendered unnecessary by Looolo’s pillowcase closure system, which uses a tried-and-true technique: overlapping flaps on the back. “Zippers and...

    01.01.09

  13. How To

    Pattern

    Notkin, who started her career making costume jewelry, has a knack for romantically contrasting hues and textures. In fact, her favorite part of the creative process comes before anything is made...

    01.01.09

  14. How To

    Concept

    On every scale, from cottage industry to mass market, production starts with research. Johnstone begins by scouring the globe for team members who have the right skills and design sense to match a...

    01.01.09

  15. How To

    Finishing

    When finishes are chosen and every-one has signed off, the factory line begins to churn. “We do a short production run of about 500 phones,” says Johnstone, “and use them heavily to gather feedback...

    01.01.09

  16. How To

    Dumpster Diving

    The first step in the Scrapile process is to acquire raw materials. Salgado and Bettencourt are beggars, not choosers: Any wood—from cherry to walnut—will do. With help from a local...

    01.01.09

  17. How To

    Building a Block

    With raw material in hand, they painstakingly assemble their scraps into a solid, ten-foot-long block that is eight inches square. To achieve the striated pattern of cascading bands that is...

    01.01.09

  18. A Design Emerges
    How To

    A Design Emerges

    All of Scrapile’s sharp modern forms come from the solid block of wood. The pieces have evolved from basic, boxy shapes to more complex lines as Salgado, who does most of the design, has...

    01.01.09

  19. How To

    The Trabecula Bench: Drawing

    Kyttänen’s designs travel straight from his imagination to the computer. “Hardly anything happens on paper anymore,” he says, “because most of the files are so complex that it’s practically...

    01.01.09

  20. The Trabecula Bench: Sintering
    How To

    The Trabecula Bench: Sintering

    “Sintering” is not an everyday word for most people—it means using laser energy to melt and fuse particles. It’s traditionally applied to metal, but nowadays it works very well on certain varieties...

    01.01.09

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