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Salone Satellite 2012

This year marks the 15-year anniversary of SaloneSatellite, the portion of Salone Internazionale del Mobile dedicated to young designers under the age of 35.
April 22, 2012
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Ralph Walker Renaissance

To Frank Lloyd Wright, Ralph Walker was “the only other honest architect in America,” and to The New York Times, he was the “architect of the century.”* Throughout his lifetime, his art deco style redefined the notion of a skyscraper thanks to his innovative detailing and ornamentation that finessed the building’s rigid structure. The 1920s and 30s witnessed Walker’s heyday—as a principal at Voorhees, Gmelin & Walker, he contributed to Manhattan’s skyline with the Barclay-Vesey Telephone Building (1926) and the Irving Trust Building at 1 Wall Street (1931). Walker was a true advocate for a new modernist architectural vision in New York and America; and starting today, an exhibition celebrating his oeuvre opens at one of the architect’s overlooked buildings at 212 West 18th Street.
March 27, 2012
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Metabolism Talks The Talk

Last night the New York Public Library hosted a sold-out talk between pioneering contemporary architect Rem Koolhaas and curator Hans Ulrich Obrist on the topic of their tome, Project Japan: Metabolism Talks. (Picture a line around the block, and a Tweet cloud generated by architects, architecture students, and the insatiably curious who can't resist such a klieg-lit occasion at the NYPL.) Paul Holdengraber, director of the library's lecture programming, engaged the two in a chat about the first non-Western avant-garde movement in architecture. In their book, published by Taschen, Koolhaas and Ulrich Obrist provide insight into a little known part of architectural history, the Metabolists, who sought to create buildings in post-war Japan capable of morphing as needed. It came as little surprise, then, that a conversation about this topic should do the same. 
March 9, 2012
MoMA Foreclosed WorkAC

Rehousing the American Dream at MoMA

By current estimates, close to 11 million American homeowners are in serious distress, owing more on their homes than the homes themselves are worth. Foreclosure rates have been elevated since the financial crisis began in 2008, and the value of the nation’s housing stock is projected to continue to plummet for the foreseeable future. The dismal state of American housing, and of the suburban landscape that’s been Ground Zero for the crisis, is the subject of “Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream”, a new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art open until July 30th. Under Chief Curator Barry Bergdoll, MoMA’s Department of Architecture & Design has brought together the contributions of five collaborative teams, each of which recasts the old-fashioned bedroom community for the 21st century.
March 1, 2012
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Architecture in Baghdad

There are many famous structures we associate with Le Corbusier (Chandigarh in India, Villa Savoye in France, the United Nations headquarters in New York), the Saddam Hussein Sports Complex in Baghdad not among them. Designed by Corbu in 1965 and built from his plans by Saddam Hussein in 1978 thirteen years after the architect’s death, the stadium is in fact the great modernist’s last built work. This is just one juicy fact gleaned from the current exhibition at New York’s Center for Architecture, "City of Mirages: Baghdad, 1952-1982". The new exhibition, organized by Collegio d’Arquitectes de Catalunya in Barcelona and curated by Spanish architect and academic Dr. Pedro Azara, uncovers 15 built and unbuilt works by the world’s best-known architects in the most unlikely of places. 
February 29, 2012
SFMOMA Dijkstra LongIslandNY

Rineke Dijkstra at SFMOMA

Yesterday I was utterly knocked out at the press preview for SFMOMA's new show "Rineke Dijkstra: Retrospective." I'd seen the Dutch photographer's work before in dribs and drabs, but taken as a whole her brand of unflinching portraiture is overwhelming. Dijkstra's photos tend to come in series—adolescents at the beach, a Croatian refugee shot over a span of decades, teenagers in the park—and much of their power comes in a sustained yet varied look at a particular subject. The shots tend to be head-on and massive, at once making heroes of her subjects and opening them up to close scrutiny. Here's a selection of Dijkstra's work, which is on view from February 18th through May 28th in San Francisco. It's her first show of this size in the United States.
February 17, 2012
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Dwell Eds Talk at USF Feb. 15

On February 15th my fellow Deputy Editor Jaime Gillin and I will take the stage at the University of San Francisco's Xavier Chapel to kick off the school's Department of Architecture and Public Design and SFAIA 2012 Spring Lecture Series. This year the theme is the "Edges of the Profession," and Jaime and I will give our two cents about the intersection of design and the media. Our talk is free and open to the public and kicks off at 7:00 PM at Xavier Chapel in Fromm Hall at USF. We'd love to see you there naturally, though if you can't make our talk there are a slew of others that look great. One of Dwell's favorite designers Stanley Saitowitz talks on April 18th and San Francisco Chronicle Urban Design Critic John King talks on May 2nd. And tell us in the comments section what you want to know about that slippery spot where the media meets architecture.
February 14, 2012
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Dwell Lounge at Sundance

Dwell brought its modern design prowess to the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, last weekend by kitting out a happening lounge at 427 Main Street. With the help of San Francisco interior designer David Mast and the good offices of Brent Jespersen and Ryan Church of Jespersen Design and Poliform SLC, we transformed an old restaurant into one of the hottest hangouts in town. The space was done in conjunction with the Gansevoort Group and the One Group and over the course of the weekend it held premiere parties, star-studded dinners, and a conversation with the Oscar-nominated director Mark Kitchell who came to talk about his new documentary on the environmental movement, "A Fierce Green Fire." The design of the space was a big hit—Ethel Kennedy stopped in and praised it—and it was great fun being in the thick of all the Sundance action. Check out the slideshow to see more.
January 27, 2012
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Massimo Scolari's Drawings at Yale

Visit the website of the Italian architect, designer, and artist Massimo Scolari and you'll be surprised to see how many drawings and paintings are lumped in with his more three-dimensional work. Architects working as painters is nothing new, but Scolari pushes his work with the brush and pen to the fore of his practice of design. The state of drawing in architecture is just what he'll take up in a lecture entitled "Is Drawing Dead" at Yale University on February 9th. From February 6th through May 4th, Scolari's own output will make the case that the answer to the question posed in his lecture is a resounding "no." In the first American retrospective of his Scolari's work as a draftsman and painter since 1986, the Yale School of Architecture presents the show Massimo Scolari: The Representation of Architecture 1967-2012. Check out this slideshow of his work, imagery that is at once fantastic, strange, and singular.
January 16, 2012
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