U.S. Pavilion Pushes Boundaries of the Venice Architecture Biennale

written by:
June 8, 2014
The curators of the U.S. Pavilion bring a working architectural office to the Venice Architecture Biennale. Read Full Article
  • 
  The central rotunda of the Palladian pavilion has been turned into a break room for both visitors and “partners." The round platform, which seems to be made of granite, is in fact a spongy material that makes for a surprisingly comfy nap. Photo by Paul Clemence.
    The central rotunda of the Palladian pavilion has been turned into a break room for both visitors and “partners." The round platform, which seems to be made of granite, is in fact a spongy material that makes for a surprisingly comfy nap. Photo by Paul Clemence.
  • 
  A curtain of mirrored metal helps erase the building’s historical references and also “dematerializes” the building by creating the sense of a porous connection between interior and exterior. Photo by Paul Clemence.
    A curtain of mirrored metal helps erase the building’s historical references and also “dematerializes” the building by creating the sense of a porous connection between interior and exterior. Photo by Paul Clemence.
  • 
  A mirror on one of the pavilion's interior walls dissolves the boundaries between interior. The reflective surface of the drafting table amplifies the effect. Photo by Paul Clemence.
    A mirror on one of the pavilion's interior walls dissolves the boundaries between interior. The reflective surface of the drafting table amplifies the effect. Photo by Paul Clemence.
  • 
  Co-curator Eva Franch i Gilabert stands in front of a wall lined by "project folders," which document the most important and ambitious projects by U.S. architects completed overseas in the last century, from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Imperial Hotel to Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum and beyond. Photo by Paul Clemence.
    Co-curator Eva Franch i Gilabert stands in front of a wall lined by "project folders," which document the most important and ambitious projects by U.S. architects completed overseas in the last century, from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Imperial Hotel to Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum and beyond. Photo by Paul Clemence.
  • 
  Designed by New York-based architecture firm Leong Leong, the pavilion’s modular drafting tables contain objects ranging from architectural models to archival magazines half-hidden under the tables' semi-transparent surfaces. Visitors are encouraged to sit at the table, touch the objects, and read the same project folders used by the pavilion’s researchers. Photo by Paul Clemence.
    Designed by New York-based architecture firm Leong Leong, the pavilion’s modular drafting tables contain objects ranging from architectural models to archival magazines half-hidden under the tables' semi-transparent surfaces. Visitors are encouraged to sit at the table, touch the objects, and read the same project folders used by the pavilion’s researchers. Photo by Paul Clemence.

@current / @total

Read Full Article

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...