Semana Carlos Motta

written by:
September 19, 2010
  • 
  The Havaianas dining chair is the result of Motta’s recent collaboration with the popular Brazilian flip-flop company, which commissioned the chair, in freijó wood covered in the same grippy rubber used for the shoes, with a rubber handle in the back. It makes its United States debut at the Espasso exhibition. Photo courtesy Espasso.
    The Havaianas dining chair is the result of Motta’s recent collaboration with the popular Brazilian flip-flop company, which commissioned the chair, in freijó wood covered in the same grippy rubber used for the shoes, with a rubber handle in the back. It makes its United States debut at the Espasso exhibition. Photo courtesy Espasso.
  • 
  Designed in 2002, the Asturias chair, also made as a rocker, was named for a favorite surf spot of Motta’s on the coast of São Paulo. “The construction technique is traditional woodworking, with rabbets [grooves] cut into the massive wood pieces,” says Motta. “In the woodshop, we always cut at basic 45-, 60- or 90-degree angles, in order to use as little equipment and electricity as possible.” Photo courtesy Espasso.
    Designed in 2002, the Asturias chair, also made as a rocker, was named for a favorite surf spot of Motta’s on the coast of São Paulo. “The construction technique is traditional woodworking, with rabbets [grooves] cut into the massive wood pieces,” says Motta. “In the woodshop, we always cut at basic 45-, 60- or 90-degree angles, in order to use as little equipment and electricity as possible.” Photo courtesy Espasso.
  • 
  The Mandacaru bench, in durable peroba rosa wood with a wax finish, was designed to complement its namesake coat hanger (next slide). “I gave a native Brazilian Indian name to these pieces because they are reminiscent of the Mandacaru cactus, full of spines, from the dry areas of north of Brazil,” says Motta. Photo courtesy Espasso.
    The Mandacaru bench, in durable peroba rosa wood with a wax finish, was designed to complement its namesake coat hanger (next slide). “I gave a native Brazilian Indian name to these pieces because they are reminiscent of the Mandacaru cactus, full of spines, from the dry areas of north of Brazil,” says Motta. Photo courtesy Espasso.
  • 
  The Mandacaru coat hanger, like the bench, was designed in 2009 of peroba rosa; Motta added ebonized cedar and Aroeira, which he says is possibly the hardest South American wood. Photo courtesy Espasso.
    The Mandacaru coat hanger, like the bench, was designed in 2009 of peroba rosa; Motta added ebonized cedar and Aroeira, which he says is possibly the hardest South American wood. Photo courtesy Espasso.
  • 
  Motta’s Butantã bench, which he says is “made of reclaimed wood from an old bridge demolition.” Photo courtesy Espasso.
    Motta’s Butantã bench, which he says is “made of reclaimed wood from an old bridge demolition.” Photo courtesy Espasso.
  • 
  Designed in 2009, the Butantã bench is held together by small, patinaed iron I beams. Photo courtesy Espasso.
    Designed in 2009, the Butantã bench is held together by small, patinaed iron I beams. Photo courtesy Espasso.
  • 
  The Mantiqueiras sofa, designed in 2001 of peroba rosa. “This is a very low sofa, so you sit very close to the floor,” says Motta. “I made the first one for my house in the mountains, to go right in front the fireplace.” Photo courtesy Espasso.
    The Mantiqueiras sofa, designed in 2001 of peroba rosa. “This is a very low sofa, so you sit very close to the floor,” says Motta. “I made the first one for my house in the mountains, to go right in front the fireplace.” Photo courtesy Espasso.
  • 
  Motta calls this Aroeira-wood table Jaraguá—“another beautiful Brazilian Indian name,” he says. “This wood was once part of a post used by the English company Light, when they came to Brazil in 1910 to install power lines from São Paulo to inland towns.” Photo courtesy Espasso.
    Motta calls this Aroeira-wood table Jaraguá—“another beautiful Brazilian Indian name,” he says. “This wood was once part of a post used by the English company Light, when they came to Brazil in 1910 to install power lines from São Paulo to inland towns.” Photo courtesy Espasso.
  • 
  The ultra-low Caju coffee table, a 2004 design in peroba rosa wood. Photo courtesy Espasso.
    The ultra-low Caju coffee table, a 2004 design in peroba rosa wood. Photo courtesy Espasso.
  • 
  “I called this chair Radar, because the back rotates around its pivot point and reminds me of a radar device,” says Motta. Designed in 2008, the chair is made of peroba rosa and oxidized iron. Photo courtesy Espasso.
    “I called this chair Radar, because the back rotates around its pivot point and reminds me of a radar device,” says Motta. Designed in 2008, the chair is made of peroba rosa and oxidized iron. Photo courtesy Espasso.
  • 
  The Horizonte desk in waxed peroba rosa and cabriúva wood, iron and leather, from 2009. Photo courtesy Espasso.
    The Horizonte desk in waxed peroba rosa and cabriúva wood, iron and leather, from 2009. Photo courtesy Espasso.
  • 
  Named after a surf spot on the São Paulo coast, Taguaíba was designed in 2008 of peroba wood. Motta says that he strives to “stay far away from the ephemeral and what is en vogue,” in his designs, which he hopes “fulfill their utilitarian function and are comfortable and durable, with a good aesthetic.” Photo courtesy Espasso.
    Named after a surf spot on the São Paulo coast, Taguaíba was designed in 2008 of peroba wood. Motta says that he strives to “stay far away from the ephemeral and what is en vogue,” in his designs, which he hopes “fulfill their utilitarian function and are comfortable and durable, with a good aesthetic.” Photo courtesy Espasso.
Previous Next
Slideshow loading...
@current / @total

You May Also Like

Join the Discussion

Loading comments...