The Museum of Modern Art: Frank Lloyd Wright Exhibition

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December 17, 2013

In February 2014, MoMA presents Frank Lloyd Wright and the City: Density vs. Dispersal, an exhibition that explores Wright’s exploration of the new American city in the 1920s and 30s.

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  St. Mark’s in the Bowery Towers, New York, 1927-31. Wright designed an apartment tower to be built in the East Village on church property, but this project was never realized because it was too radical for the church rector. The all-glass- and copper building was meant to evoke a suburban feeling in Manhattan with sunlit apartments and a leafy park. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Jeffrey P. Klein Purchase Fund, Barbara Pine Purchase Fund, and Frederieke Taylor Purchase Fund.
    St. Mark’s in the Bowery Towers, New York, 1927-31. Wright designed an apartment tower to be built in the East Village on church property, but this project was never realized because it was too radical for the church rector. The all-glass- and copper building was meant to evoke a suburban feeling in Manhattan with sunlit apartments and a leafy park. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Jeffrey P. Klein Purchase Fund, Barbara Pine Purchase Fund, and Frederieke Taylor Purchase Fund.
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  Frank Lloyd Wright and Eugene Masselink at the exhibition Frank Lloyd Wright, American Architect, November 13, 1940–January 5, 1941, in The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Soichi Sunami.
    Frank Lloyd Wright and Eugene Masselink at the exhibition Frank Lloyd Wright, American Architect, November 13, 1940–January 5, 1941, in The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Soichi Sunami.
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  Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Broadacre City Model as an example of low-density development over a large area. It toured the country for several years in the 1930s and provides a counterpoint to his skyscrapers. The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York). Photo by Roy E. Petersen.
    Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Broadacre City Model as an example of low-density development over a large area. It toured the country for several years in the 1930s and provides a counterpoint to his skyscrapers. The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York). Photo by Roy E. Petersen.
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  This is the painted model of Broadacre City, showing the amount of undeveloped land between residences. The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York).
    This is the painted model of Broadacre City, showing the amount of undeveloped land between residences. The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York).
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  Although the Price Tower is Wright’s only realized skyscraper, the rendering of the Grouped Towers in Chicago portrays similar themes of lightness and balance. The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York).
    Although the Price Tower is Wright’s only realized skyscraper, the rendering of the Grouped Towers in Chicago portrays similar themes of lightness and balance. The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York).

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