'Moving Meshes' at Domaine de Boisbuchet

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September 6, 2012

Mesh and wireframe structures might typically be reserved for the architectural design realm, but Dutch designer Maria Blaisse aims to expand the rules of textiles and flexible materials with her long-standing commitment to movement research. Blaisse's latest exhibition, Moving Meshes, highlights the resilience of bamboo as a medium for expanding and contracting volumes, which are based on improvisational gestures and the body as the critical element in the animation of material and form. Currently on view in the château interiors of Domaine de Boisbuchet, an international center for experimentation in design and architecture, Blaisse's work is a fluid exploration of volume and spatial control—quite modern for the setting of a country estate in the Southwest of France.

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  The sunlit interiors of Domaine de Boisbuchet come to life with Dutch designer Maria Blaisse's bamboo structures in the Moving Meshes exhibition. Part organic sculpture, part costume design, these lattice-like forms suggest new possibilities for textile applications in architecture and design.  Courtesy of:
    The sunlit interiors of Domaine de Boisbuchet come to life with Dutch designer Maria Blaisse's bamboo structures in the Moving Meshes exhibition. Part organic sculpture, part costume design, these lattice-like forms suggest new possibilities for textile applications in architecture and design.

    Courtesy of:

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  An expanding and contracting bamboo mesh by Dutch designer Maria Blaisse tests the resiliency of woven materials and the art of gesture in defining space and volume. Moving Meshes includes five spherical forms like this one as well as accompanying video to demonstrate improvisational interactions in the gallery's exhibition setting.  Courtesy of:
    An expanding and contracting bamboo mesh by Dutch designer Maria Blaisse tests the resiliency of woven materials and the art of gesture in defining space and volume. Moving Meshes includes five spherical forms like this one as well as accompanying video to demonstrate improvisational interactions in the gallery's exhibition setting.

    Courtesy of:

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  Diagrams along the gallery walls show the permutations that the user might explore when interacting with Blaisse's lattice frameworks. Materials are delicate to the touch but resilient in nature.  Courtesy of:
    Diagrams along the gallery walls show the permutations that the user might explore when interacting with Blaisse's lattice frameworks. Materials are delicate to the touch but resilient in nature.

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  Here's a detail of the diagram.  Courtesy of:
    Here's a detail of the diagram.

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  The pieces illustrate both the delicate and robust qualities of bamboo, and the strength that comes from fluid design properties. Blaisse encourages her participants to be challenged by what "control" means in this new context.  Courtesy of:
    The pieces illustrate both the delicate and robust qualities of bamboo, and the strength that comes from fluid design properties. Blaisse encourages her participants to be challenged by what "control" means in this new context.

    Courtesy of:

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  The exhibition is informed by the designer's extensive background in textiles and materials research. Her work with choreographers, fashion designers, and filmmakers explores interactions between environments, interior spaces, and people.  Courtesy of:
    The exhibition is informed by the designer's extensive background in textiles and materials research. Her work with choreographers, fashion designers, and filmmakers explores interactions between environments, interior spaces, and people.

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  The interiors of Domaine de Boisbuchet serve as a raw backdrop for Maria Blaisse's movement research investigation.  Courtesy of:
    The interiors of Domaine de Boisbuchet serve as a raw backdrop for Maria Blaisse's movement research investigation.

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  Maria Blaisse has collaborated with designer Issey Miyake; dancers Kenzo Kusuda, Makiko Ito, Marcela Giesche, and Michael Schumacher; and select contemporary filmmakers. The span of these multi-disciplinary investigations have reached audiences in theaters, on the catwalks, and in major exhibitions internationally.  Courtesy of:
    Maria Blaisse has collaborated with designer Issey Miyake; dancers Kenzo Kusuda, Makiko Ito, Marcela Giesche, and Michael Schumacher; and select contemporary filmmakers. The span of these multi-disciplinary investigations have reached audiences in theaters, on the catwalks, and in major exhibitions internationally.

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