"Living in a Modern Way" at LACMA

written by:
October 6, 2011
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  For the first time, the living room of the Case Study #8 house in Pacific Palisades has been disassembled and reassembled for the public to view. Contrary to how Eames furniture is so often employed today—in a stark, utilitarian manner—in the Eames living room, their designs mingled with textiles, collectibles and memorabilia, and even the famous yellowing Nelson lamp.
    For the first time, the living room of the Case Study #8 house in Pacific Palisades has been disassembled and reassembled for the public to view. Contrary to how Eames furniture is so often employed today—in a stark, utilitarian manner—in the Eames living room, their designs mingled with textiles, collectibles and memorabilia, and even the famous yellowing Nelson lamp.
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  Just as in the Eames house, at LACMA’s exhibition the couple’s Lounge Chair is placed against floor-to-ceiling glass window walls near the entrance.
    Just as in the Eames house, at LACMA’s exhibition the couple’s Lounge Chair is placed against floor-to-ceiling glass window walls near the entrance.
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  Mary Anne DeWeese designed this pair of bathing suits (a bikini for her, trunks and a t-shirt for him) for the Catalina Sportswear company in 1949. The lobster motif may evoke Maine, but it's hard to imagine too many bathing beauties on the rocky shores of South Portland.
    Mary Anne DeWeese designed this pair of bathing suits (a bikini for her, trunks and a t-shirt for him) for the Catalina Sportswear company in 1949. The lobster motif may evoke Maine, but it's hard to imagine too many bathing beauties on the rocky shores of South Portland.
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  La Gardo Tackett created this garden sculpture around 1955 for Architectural Pottery; it comes from the collection of the ceramic manufacturer’s owner, Max Lawrence. Tackett based the forms on highly abstracted totem poles.
    La Gardo Tackett created this garden sculpture around 1955 for Architectural Pottery; it comes from the collection of the ceramic manufacturer’s owner, Max Lawrence. Tackett based the forms on highly abstracted totem poles.
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  Greta Magnusson Grossman, who was born in Sweden, made this formica, walnut and iron desk for Glenn of California in 1952. Also an architect, Grossman designed homes in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sweden.
    Greta Magnusson Grossman, who was born in Sweden, made this formica, walnut and iron desk for Glenn of California in 1952. Also an architect, Grossman designed homes in Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sweden.
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  A gunwood dresser with a mirror by R.M. Schindler, made for the Ruth Shep house in Silver Lake, circa 1934–38. Schindler created several house designs for Shep before settling on the later design, for which he also designed furnishings.  Courtesy of Restricted.
    A gunwood dresser with a mirror by R.M. Schindler, made for the Ruth Shep house in Silver Lake, circa 1934–38. Schindler created several house designs for Shep before settling on the later design, for which he also designed furnishings. Courtesy of Restricted.
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  Designer Herbert Leupin's poster for Trix, a household spray meant to keep moths away, appeared in 1952 and is in the Design Museum Zurich's poster collection.
    Designer Herbert Leupin's poster for Trix, a household spray meant to keep moths away, appeared in 1952 and is in the Design Museum Zurich's poster collection.
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  Hungarian designer Paul Laszlo created this cotton-rayon textile in 1954 or before; its strong Miró-esque forms evoke a cultural cross-section of modernism.
    Hungarian designer Paul Laszlo created this cotton-rayon textile in 1954 or before; its strong Miró-esque forms evoke a cultural cross-section of modernism.
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  An early (1936) trailer by Wallace “Wally” M. Byam, named the Clipper after the popular Pan Am aircraft. Called an “airplane without wings” by its creator, the Clipper represented the freedom inherent in trailer travel. Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our  FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!
    An early (1936) trailer by Wallace “Wally” M. Byam, named the Clipper after the popular Pan Am aircraft. Called an “airplane without wings” by its creator, the Clipper represented the freedom inherent in trailer travel.

    Don't miss a word of Dwell! Download our FREE app from iTunes, friend us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter!

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