Landscapes of Quarantine

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March 17, 2010

In the fall and winter of 2009/2010, Future Plural (the combined forces for former Dwell senior editor and BLDGBLOG author Geoff Manaugh and Edible Geography author Nicola Twilley) held a design studio in New York City focused on the idea of quarantine. The resulting work from the 18 artists, designers, and architects who participated in the studio is now on display at the Storefront for Art and Architecture as the exhibition Landscapes of Quarantine. The work on display includes infographics about invasive species, posters explaining how not to get bored while in quarantine, and maps dipicting the architectural possibilities of quarantines.

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  Exterior view of Storefront for Art and Architecture with the Landscapes of Quarantine graphic by exhibition designer Glen Cummings, MTWTF, and Context/Shift by Brian Slocum. Photo by Emiliano Gradano.
    Exterior view of Storefront for Art and Architecture with the Landscapes of Quarantine graphic by exhibition designer Glen Cummings, MTWTF, and Context/Shift by Brian Slocum. Photo by Emiliano Gradano.
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  "You are entering Landscapes of Quarantine." The welcome sign to Landscapes of Quarantine, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010. Photo by Emiliano Gradano.
    "You are entering Landscapes of Quarantine." The welcome sign to Landscapes of Quarantine, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010. Photo by Emiliano Gradano.
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  The Landscapes of Quarantine installation at Storefront for Art and Architecture. In this shot, left to right: Containing Uncertainty by Smudge Studio, Precious Isolation: A Pair of Invasive Species by Thomas Pollman, Lab IV by Mim Lien, Thermal Scanner and Body Temperature Alert System by Daniel Perlin, and Field Notes from Quarantine by Katie Holten. Photo by Nicola Twilley.
    The Landscapes of Quarantine installation at Storefront for Art and Architecture. In this shot, left to right: Containing Uncertainty by Smudge Studio, Precious Isolation: A Pair of Invasive Species by Thomas Pollman, Lab IV by Mim Lien, Thermal Scanner and Body Temperature Alert System by Daniel Perlin, and Field Notes from Quarantine by Katie Holten. Photo by Nicola Twilley.
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  Containing Uncertainty (2010) by Smudge Studio (ONKALO schemata). On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.From curators Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley: "Spent nuclear fuel must be isolated from all biological life for at least a million years, until its toxic radioactive particles finally decay to non-hazardous levels. Smudge Studio’s work explores the material, spatial, and conceptual challenges of designing an infinite quarantine: one that must last half as long again as the entire history of humanity in order to protect the future from our present."
    Containing Uncertainty (2010) by Smudge Studio (ONKALO schemata). On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.

    From curators Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley: "Spent nuclear fuel must be isolated from all biological life for at least a million years, until its toxic radioactive particles finally decay to non-hazardous levels. Smudge Studio’s work explores the material, spatial, and conceptual challenges of designing an infinite quarantine: one that must last half as long again as the entire history of humanity in order to protect the future from our present."
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  Containing Uncertainty (2010) by Smudge Studio (ONKALO schemata). On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.
    Containing Uncertainty (2010) by Smudge Studio (ONKALO schemata). On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.
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  Precious Isolation: A Pair of Invasive Species (2010) by Thomas Pollman. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.From curators Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley: "The mobile infrastructure of perimeter defense and personal protection that allows the U.S. president to travel around the world is here compared by architect Thomas Pollman to the climate-controlled environments of Plant Rescue Centers inside of which illegally imported plants secretly flourish. Endangered orchids and U.S. presidents alike are confined within hermetically sealed worlds, expensive microcosms cut off from their surroundings."
    Precious Isolation: A Pair of Invasive Species (2010) by Thomas Pollman. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.

    From curators Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley: "The mobile infrastructure of perimeter defense and personal protection that allows the U.S. president to travel around the world is here compared by architect Thomas Pollman to the climate-controlled environments of Plant Rescue Centers inside of which illegally imported plants secretly flourish. Endangered orchids and U.S. presidents alike are confined within hermetically sealed worlds, expensive microcosms cut off from their surroundings."
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  The Landscapes of Quarantine installation at Storefront for Art and Architecture. In this shot, left to right: Q-City: An Investigation by Front Studio and NYCQ by Amanda Spielman and Jordan Spielman. Photo by Nicola Twilley.
    The Landscapes of Quarantine installation at Storefront for Art and Architecture. In this shot, left to right: Q-City: An Investigation by Front Studio and NYCQ by Amanda Spielman and Jordan Spielman. Photo by Nicola Twilley.
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  Q-City: An Investigation (2010) by Front Studio, Yen Ha, Michi Yanagishita, and Joshua Cummings. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.From curators Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley: "Quarantine spaces are usually hidden: the sick and suspect are kept out of sight and out of mind behind closed doors or on remote islands. But is there a way to make quarantine visible, marbling it throughout the fabric of the city? What would the social, economic, infrastructural, and architectural implications of a “separate but equal,” city-wide distributed quarantine be? Front Studio’s investigation led them to consider the ethics of enforced segregation, the behavioral impact of economic incentives, and even the potential adaptive reuse of phone booths – all mapped onto the streetscapes of New York City."
    Q-City: An Investigation (2010) by Front Studio, Yen Ha, Michi Yanagishita, and Joshua Cummings. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.

    From curators Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley: "Quarantine spaces are usually hidden: the sick and suspect are kept out of sight and out of mind behind closed doors or on remote islands. But is there a way to make quarantine visible, marbling it throughout the fabric of the city? What would the social, economic, infrastructural, and architectural implications of a “separate but equal,” city-wide distributed quarantine be? Front Studio’s investigation led them to consider the ethics of enforced segregation, the behavioral impact of economic incentives, and even the potential adaptive reuse of phone booths – all mapped onto the streetscapes of New York City."
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  Q-City: An Investigation (2010) by Front Studio, Yen Ha, Michi Yanagishita, and Joshua Cummings. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.
    Q-City: An Investigation (2010) by Front Studio, Yen Ha, Michi Yanagishita, and Joshua Cummings. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.
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  NYCQ poster in the Keep Active series that suggest ways to overcome boredom while in quarantine (2010) by Amanda Spielman and Jordan Spielman. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.From curators Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley: "The CDC itself admits that in the event of a pandemic, 'community and faith-based organizations' will be responsible for many aspects of 'preparedness at the local level.' Stepping into the gap left in federal and state planning, this brother and sister team present NYCQ – a grassroots public awareness campaign that contains helpful information for New Yorkers living through a pandemic, shot through with tongue-in-cheek humor to reveal the logistical insanity of large-scale urban quarantine."
    NYCQ poster in the Keep Active series that suggest ways to overcome boredom while in quarantine (2010) by Amanda Spielman and Jordan Spielman. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.

    From curators Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley: "The CDC itself admits that in the event of a pandemic, 'community and faith-based organizations' will be responsible for many aspects of 'preparedness at the local level.' Stepping into the gap left in federal and state planning, this brother and sister team present NYCQ – a grassroots public awareness campaign that contains helpful information for New Yorkers living through a pandemic, shot through with tongue-in-cheek humor to reveal the logistical insanity of large-scale urban quarantine."
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  NYCQ poster in the Keep Active series that suggest ways to overcome boredom while in quarantine (2010) by Amanda Spielman and Jordan Spielman. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.
    NYCQ poster in the Keep Active series that suggest ways to overcome boredom while in quarantine (2010) by Amanda Spielman and Jordan Spielman. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.
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  NYCQ, a spread from the brochure Stay Healthy: Coughing and Sneezing: Stop the Spread of Germs To and From Yourself and Others  (2010) by Amanda Spielman and Jordan Spielman. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.
    NYCQ, a spread from the brochure Stay Healthy: Coughing and Sneezing: Stop the Spread of Germs To and From Yourself and Others (2010) by Amanda Spielman and Jordan Spielman. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.
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  The Landscapes of Quarantine installation at Storefront for Art and Architecture. In this shot, left to right: NYCQ by Amanda Spielman and Jordan Spielman, Hotel III by Mimi Lien, Did We Build The Frontier To Keep It Close? by Scott Geiger, and Pages 179-187 by Joe Alterio. Photo by Nicola Twilley.
    The Landscapes of Quarantine installation at Storefront for Art and Architecture. In this shot, left to right: NYCQ by Amanda Spielman and Jordan Spielman, Hotel III by Mimi Lien, Did We Build The Frontier To Keep It Close? by Scott Geiger, and Pages 179-187 by Joe Alterio. Photo by Nicola Twilley.
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  Pages 179-187 (2010) by Joe Alterio. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.From curators Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley: "Myths, legends, and folk tales weave their stories around a grain of inherited wisdom: taken together, they form a catalog of humanity’s recurring weaknesses and occasional strengths. Some lessons are never learned, however, and many tales have been lost along the way. Alterio’s rediscovered myth tells the story of a town that delegates responsibility for imposing quarantine onto a machine, in the hope of bypassing human prejudice. The disastrous result – everyone is suspect because no one can be proven completely healthy – shows the fundamental arbitrariness of the labels on which quarantine relies."
    Pages 179-187 (2010) by Joe Alterio. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.

    From curators Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley: "Myths, legends, and folk tales weave their stories around a grain of inherited wisdom: taken together, they form a catalog of humanity’s recurring weaknesses and occasional strengths. Some lessons are never learned, however, and many tales have been lost along the way. Alterio’s rediscovered myth tells the story of a town that delegates responsibility for imposing quarantine onto a machine, in the hope of bypassing human prejudice. The disastrous result – everyone is suspect because no one can be proven completely healthy – shows the fundamental arbitrariness of the labels on which quarantine relies."
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  The Landscapes of Quarantine installation at Storefront for Art and Architecture. In this shot, left to right: Map 002 Quarantine by David Garcia Studio and Quick by Richard Mosse. Photo by Emiliano Gradano.
    The Landscapes of Quarantine installation at Storefront for Art and Architecture. In this shot, left to right: Map 002 Quarantine by David Garcia Studio and Quick by Richard Mosse. Photo by Emiliano Gradano.
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  Map 002 Quarantine (2010) by David Garcia Studio. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.From curators Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley: "Though architect David Garcia is based in Copenhagen, when he read the Landscapes of Quarantine studio brief and online updates, he decided to participate at a distance by dedicating the 2nd edition of his MAP project to the architectural possibilities of quarantine. Garcia’s MAP presents a wealth of data, imagery, and ideas: it is both a reminder of the vast and variable terrains of quarantine, and an invitation to pick up a copy and join the design exploration yourself."
    Map 002 Quarantine (2010) by David Garcia Studio. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.

    From curators Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley: "Though architect David Garcia is based in Copenhagen, when he read the Landscapes of Quarantine studio brief and online updates, he decided to participate at a distance by dedicating the 2nd edition of his MAP project to the architectural possibilities of quarantine. Garcia’s MAP presents a wealth of data, imagery, and ideas: it is both a reminder of the vast and variable terrains of quarantine, and an invitation to pick up a copy and join the design exploration yourself."
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  Map 002 Quarantine (2010) by David Garcia Studio. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.
    Map 002 Quarantine (2010) by David Garcia Studio. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.
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  Suck (2010) by INABA Prjoects and C-Lab. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.
    Suck (2010) by INABA Prjoects and C-Lab. On display as part of the Landscapes of Quarantine show, a group exhibition at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York, on view through April 17, 2010.

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