Advertising
Advertising

You are here

'Design through the Ages' Kicks off City Modern

Read Article

City Modern—Dwell and New York Magazine's collaborative week-long collection of talks, studio and home tours showcasing New York architecture and design—began Monday evening with the opening of Design Through the Ages. Four interior designers: Nate Berkus, Francis D'Haene, Thom Filicia, and Ghislaine Vinas each explore a distinct era of time. The designers hand-picked pieces from showrooms at the New York Design Center, who also hosts the exhibition.

  • 
    Photo by: Sara Dierck

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

  • 
  Designer Ghislaine Vinas with her 1960s inspired selections. Graphic wallpaper by Flavor Paper.

How does one balance so many bright colors when they’re decorating a room? “I always say this: getting a white base—and I mean a really white base, not cream or beige—is really important for contemporary interiors,” Vinas says. “In this case we have a really graphic black and white and it’s like painting really. You have to balance out the colors. It’s all about composition and getting the colors right.”  Photo by: Sara Dierck
    Designer Ghislaine Vinas with her 1960s inspired selections. Graphic wallpaper by Flavor Paper. How does one balance so many bright colors when they’re decorating a room? “I always say this: getting a white base—and I mean a really white base, not cream or beige—is really important for contemporary interiors,” Vinas says. “In this case we have a really graphic black and white and it’s like painting really. You have to balance out the colors. It’s all about composition and getting the colors right.”

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

  • 
  “If you look at the 60s it’s all about a really graphic black and white and these pops of color,” Vinas says.  Photo by: Sara Dierck
    “If you look at the 60s it’s all about a really graphic black and white and these pops of color,” Vinas says.

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

  • 
  “I'm really inspired by the 60s and always have been,” Vinas says. “It's something I really gravitate toward. It's a hide and go seek game at 200 Lex [the New York Design Center]. You just go find your pieces that are calling your name.”  Photo by: Sara Dierck
    “I'm really inspired by the 60s and always have been,” Vinas says. “It's something I really gravitate toward. It's a hide and go seek game at 200 Lex [the New York Design Center]. You just go find your pieces that are calling your name.”

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

  • 
  The 70s, curated by designer Nate Berkus. Berkus pulled together vintage pieces from 1st Dibs, wallpaper from Flavor Paper, and his own collection of accessories available at Target.  Photo by: Sara DierckCourtesy of: Neilson Barnard
    The 70s, curated by designer Nate Berkus. Berkus pulled together vintage pieces from 1st Dibs, wallpaper from Flavor Paper, and his own collection of accessories available at Target.

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

    Courtesy of: Neilson Barnard

  • 
  The organic form of a philodendron leaf and its shadows play off of the geometric shapes and patterns of Berkus’s selections.  Photo by: Sara Dierck
    The organic form of a philodendron leaf and its shadows play off of the geometric shapes and patterns of Berkus’s selections.

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

  • 
  “There is something so memorable about 70’s inspired design,” Berkus says. 
He balances the “metallic sheens and edginess” of an aluminum side table with a crisp, graphic carpet and the softness of fur.  Photo by: Sara Dierck
    “There is something so memorable about 70’s inspired design,” Berkus says. He balances the “metallic sheens and edginess” of an aluminum side table with a crisp, graphic carpet and the softness of fur.

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

  • 
  Designer Francis D’Haene took on the challenge of the “ME! ME! ME!” decade of the 80s. “It’s a difficult decade because you can’t find a lot of 80s pieces,” D’Haene says. “I absolutely took a fun approach.”  Photo by: Sara Dierck
    Designer Francis D’Haene took on the challenge of the “ME! ME! ME!” decade of the 80s. “It’s a difficult decade because you can’t find a lot of 80s pieces,” D’Haene says. “I absolutely took a fun approach.”

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

  • 
  Fake money was crammed into drawers and filled a large vessel sitting under a neon “Money Orders” sign. “My three-year-old and six-year-old assisted me in photocopying their toy money, cutting it up, and crumbling it,” D’Haene explains. “It was a Sunday project. It was a lot of fun.”  Photo by: Sara Dierck
    Fake money was crammed into drawers and filled a large vessel sitting under a neon “Money Orders” sign. “My three-year-old and six-year-old assisted me in photocopying their toy money, cutting it up, and crumbling it,” D’Haene explains. “It was a Sunday project. It was a lot of fun.”

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

  • 
  D’Haene sits amongst his collection of objects mirroring the “decade of decadence.” “To me, the lesson to be learned is that you should be more humble,” D’Haene says. Nevertheless, his assortment of brash designs and neon sculptures are vibrant and delightful.  Photo by: Sara Dierck
    D’Haene sits amongst his collection of objects mirroring the “decade of decadence.” “To me, the lesson to be learned is that you should be more humble,” D’Haene says. Nevertheless, his assortment of brash designs and neon sculptures are vibrant and delightful.

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

  • 
  Close up of a “contemporary glass sculpture,” filled with candy in D’Haene’s 80s-themed office arrangement.  Photo by: Sara Dierck
    Close up of a “contemporary glass sculpture,” filled with candy in D’Haene’s 80s-themed office arrangement.

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

  • 
  American-made interiors and designs showcase the look of the present assembled by designer Thom Filicia.  Photo by: Sara DierckCourtesy of: Neilson Barnard
    American-made interiors and designs showcase the look of the present assembled by designer Thom Filicia.

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

    Courtesy of: Neilson Barnard

  • 
  Filicia brought together pieces from his own collection for Safaviah with selections from the New York Design Center. “What I love about design in this moment is that it bridges all time periods and styles effortlessly,” Filicia says  Photo by: Sara Dierck
    Filicia brought together pieces from his own collection for Safaviah with selections from the New York Design Center. “What I love about design in this moment is that it bridges all time periods and styles effortlessly,” Filicia says

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

  • 
  Elements of nature, organic forms, and clean colors are illustrated in Filicia’s comfortable living room setting.  Photo by: Sara Dierck
    Elements of nature, organic forms, and clean colors are illustrated in Filicia’s comfortable living room setting.

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

  • 
  The opening night crowd at “Design Through the Ages.”

Furnishings provided by Stephanie Odegard Collection, HighTower, 1stdibs, Weinberg Modern, Smith and Watson, Brueton, Giorgetti, Global Views, Arteriors Home, Dennis Miller Associates, Thom Filicia Home Collection for Safavieh, and accessories by Nate Berkus at Target.

“Design Through the Ages” is on view October 2-5 from 10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the New York Design Center, 200 Lexington Avenue, 15th Floor, New York, NY, and is free to the public.  Photo by: Sara Dierck
    The opening night crowd at “Design Through the Ages.” Furnishings provided by Stephanie Odegard Collection, HighTower, 1stdibs, Weinberg Modern, Smith and Watson, Brueton, Giorgetti, Global Views, Arteriors Home, Dennis Miller Associates, Thom Filicia Home Collection for Safavieh, and accessories by Nate Berkus at Target. “Design Through the Ages” is on view October 2-5 from 10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the New York Design Center, 200 Lexington Avenue, 15th Floor, New York, NY, and is free to the public.

    Photo by: Sara Dierck

@current / @total

Categories:

More

Add comment

Log in or register to post comments
Advertising