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Never Built: Los Angeles at A+D Architecture & Design Museum

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Never Built: Los Angeles, an upcoming exhibition at the A+D Architecture and Design Museum Los Angeles (on view from July 28 through September 29) will highlight radical projects that would have deeply changed Los Angeles—but for one reason or another never got off the ground.
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  Pereira and Luckman’s 1952 design for Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) called for a glass-enclosed central terminal, with a world map etched on the central column. Their original plan died because the city's Building Department found it too radical, the cost of air-conditioning would have been exorbitant and the airlines wanted their own individual terminals. Image courtesy LAX Flight Path Learning Center.
    Pereira and Luckman’s 1952 design for Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) called for a glass-enclosed central terminal, with a world map etched on the central column. Their original plan died because the city's Building Department found it too radical, the cost of air-conditioning would have been exorbitant and the airlines wanted their own individual terminals. Image courtesy LAX Flight Path Learning Center.
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  The Santa Monica Offshore Freeway, proposed in 1965, envisioned a freeway, man-made islands, and a new marina enclosing Santa Monica Bay. Image courtesy City of Santa Monica.
    The Santa Monica Offshore Freeway, proposed in 1965, envisioned a freeway, man-made islands, and a new marina enclosing Santa Monica Bay. Image courtesy City of Santa Monica.
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  In 1925, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed a Civic Center Plan design to reconceive the city's metropolitan core. Anais Nin, who visited Wright’s studio sometime in the late 1940s, looked at his plans and wrote in her diary: “I saw [his] plans for Los Angeles. It could have been the most beautiful city in the world… But architecture had been taken over by business-men, and Lloyd the artist was not allowed to carry out his incredibly rich, fecund concepts… If his plans had been carried out, the world would have been dazzled by them.” Image courtesy Eric Lloyd Wright.
    In 1925, Frank Lloyd Wright proposed a Civic Center Plan design to reconceive the city's metropolitan core. Anais Nin, who visited Wright’s studio sometime in the late 1940s, looked at his plans and wrote in her diary: “I saw [his] plans for Los Angeles. It could have been the most beautiful city in the world… But architecture had been taken over by business-men, and Lloyd the artist was not allowed to carry out his incredibly rich, fecund concepts… If his plans had been carried out, the world would have been dazzled by them.” Image courtesy Eric Lloyd Wright.
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  In 2001, OMA and Rem Koolhaas proposed a translucent roof that would put all of LACMA under a single lid. It never happened. Image courtesy OMA.
    In 2001, OMA and Rem Koolhaas proposed a translucent roof that would put all of LACMA under a single lid. It never happened. Image courtesy OMA.
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  Goodell's proposed 1963 Monorail resembled a Cadillac, would cover a 60-mile stretch, and could go 90 miles per hour. Image courtesy Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority Research Library and Archive.
    Goodell's proposed 1963 Monorail resembled a Cadillac, would cover a 60-mile stretch, and could go 90 miles per hour. Image courtesy Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority Research Library and Archive.

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